#LL2LU Show your work – grade 4

How might we foster a community of learners where everyone bravely and fiercely seeks feedback?

I was at EduCon in Philadelphia when this tweet arrived last week.

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Am I showing enough work? How do I know? What if we partner, students and teachers, to seek feedback, clarity, and guidance?Screen Shot 2015-01-30 at 3.45.26 PM

Success inspires success.

Yesterday, I dropped by Kato‘s classroom to work on the next math assessment and found our learners working together to apply math and to improve communication.

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Now, I was just sneaking in to drop off and pick up papers.  But, how could I turn down requests for feedback?

Here’s the #showyourwork #LL2LU progression in the classroom:

Grade 4

Level 4
I can show more than one way to find a solution to the problem.

Level 3
I can describe or illustrate how I arrived at a solution in a way that the reader understands without talking to me.

Level 2
I can find a correct solution to the problem.

Level 1
I can ask questions to help me work toward a solution to the problem.

And here’s one child and her work. “Ms. Gough, will you look at my work? Can you understand it without asking me questions? Is is clear to you?”

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I see connected words, pictures, and numbers. I like the color coding for the different size bags.  I appreciate reading the sentences that explain the numbers and her thinking.  I also witnessed this young learner improve her work and her thinking while watching me read her work.  She knew what she wanted to add, because she wished I knew why she made the final choice.  I’d call this Level 4 work.

What if we foster a community of learners who bravely and fiercely seek feedback?

Teachnology: Using technology “differently” (TBT Remix)

When we ponder how, when and why to integrate technology, do we consider how learners might use digital tools as instruments of self-assessment, feedback, and tinkering to learn?

Last week I was “schooled” in using technology by a first grader.

agough

She was invited to write for edu180atl.  Her post was published on 5.2.12.  To draft her post, we selected two pictures to use as inspiration.  She wrote a story for each picture and selected one for submission.  HOW she used technology to write was a HUGE lesson for me.

She took my computer from me and wrote 3 sentences.  There was a word that had a red “crinkly” line under it.

 

The instant feedback transitioned the technology to teachnology; it caused her to ask herself questions.  Finally, she asked me how to spell inspired.  Then, she read her 3 sentences out loud and decided that she needed another sentence in between two of the current sentences.  (Do I do that when I write?)

She was determined to have 200 words, not 198 words or 205 words.  She wanted 200 words exactly.  She learned how to use the word count feature since both stories were in the same document.  She read out loud and deleted words.  She read out loud again and added words.  It was awesome to watch.  She chose to ask to have a “peer” editor.  “Are there 2 words that I can delete? I want exactly 200 words.”  How much more confidence would I have about my writing if I had published articles and ideas when I was younger?

This experience with my first grader makes me wonder about learning – well, anything – with technology.  What assumptions do we make about what learners will and won’t learn if we put technology in their hands?

“How can we focus on what we do best without missing new opportunities to do better?” (Davidson, 17 pag.)

_________________________

Davidson, Cathy N. “I’ll Count-You Take Care of the Gorilla.” Introduction. Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Viking, 2011. 17. Print.


LEARNing: Using technology “differently” was originally posted on May 14, 2012

Connect, extend, challenge: using digital tools, tinkering to learn

How do we use technology to learn and grow, make mistakes and try again, test and revise?

In our EduCon “do and dialogue” session, Doodling the C’s: Creativity, Comprehension, Communication & Connections, Shelley and I used the Visible Thinking Routine: Connect, Extend, Challenge as a reflection and discussion tool after each round of doodling.

We have been using the following side in previous learning sessions.

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Not bad, but not a doodle.  Shelley produced the following awesome doodle to help learners engage with this routine as they reflect on their learning.

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Shelley asked me to add color.  Here’s where I learned something new and exciting.  I took a picture of Shelley’s doodle with my iPad and imported it into the Procreate app.

Using the app, I could try color, undo when I didn’t like it, and try again.  I do not have the ability to undo when using my favorite pens.  Using undo and redo gave me the opportunity to test, assess, and revise until I was happy with my additions to Shelley’s great doodle. Here’s the version I pitched to be the final.

photo[1]

We immediately agreed that the question mark’s yellow was not what we wanted.  If I’d used ink on paper, we would not have been able to revise and play with color without a complete redraw.

Together, we removed the yellow and tried several other colors.  Finally, Shelley suggested that we just continue the green them for challenge.

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When we ponder how, when and why to integrate technology, do we consider how learners might use digital tools as instruments of self-assessment, feedback, and tinkering to learn?

#TEDTalkTuesday: need more sleep – here’s why

Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?

… sleep is not an indulgence. It’s not some sort of thing that we can take on board rather casually. I think that sleep was once likened to an upgrade from economy to business class, you know, the equivalent of.  It’s not even an upgrade from economy to first class. The critical thing to realize is that if you don’t sleep, you don’t fly. Essentially, you never get there, and what’s extraordinary about much of our society these days is that we are desperately sleep-deprived.

Jeff Iliff: One more reason to get a good night’s sleep

We’ve found that sleep may actually be a kind of elegant design solution to some of the brain’s most basic needs, a unique way that the brain meets the high demands and the narrow margins that set it apart from all the other organs of the body.

Arianna Huffington: How to succeed? Get more sleep

So as we are facing all the multiple crises in our world at the moment, what is good for us on a personal level, what’s going to bring more joy, gratitude, effectiveness in our lives and be the best for our own careers is also what is best for the world. 

What is a Fraction? – visual lesson

What if content isn’t the essential learning? What if content is just the vehicle to learn process?

Imagine these essential learnings:

Show your work:
I can describe and illustrate my thinking so that a reader understands without having to talking with me.

Mathematical flexibility:
I can apply mathematical flexibility to show what I know using more than one method.

 Our 5th graders just started a unit on fractions. What if we use fractions to teach our young learners to show their work and demonstrate flexibility of thought?

Lesson tic-toc

  • Introduce the two essential learnings.
  • 60 second quick write to recall what is a fraction?
  • 60 seconds of pair-share to improve answers to what is a fraction? 

what_is_fraction

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  • Regularly return to the essentials to learn and the associated learning progressions.  How are we doing? At what level are we right now? What is a next step?
  • 60 second quick write to recall what are equivalent fractions?
  • 60 seconds of pair-share to improve answers to what are equivalent fractions?
  • How might we use technology for learning and investigation?

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How might we put process and product on even ground? What if we emphasize communication and flexibility and use content and skill as vehicles to show what you know and how you can communicate?


Level 4
I can analyze different pathways to success, find connections, between pathways, and add new strategies to my thinking.

Level 3
I can apply mathematical flexibility to show what I know using more than one method.

Level 2
I can show my work to document one successful method.

Level 1
I can find and state a correct solution.


Level 4
I can show what I know using words, numbers, and pictures.

Level 3
I can describe and illustrate how I arrived at a solution so that a reader understands without having to talking with me.

Level 2
I can describe or illustrate how I arrived at a solution so that a reader understands without having to talking with me.

Level 1
I can find a correct solution to a task.

Doodling the C’s: Creativity, Comprehension, Communication & Connections #educon

How might note taking become more active, personal, brain-compatible and shareable? How might we incorporate symbols and doodles to improve listening, better express ideas, summarize/synthesize learning and make connections? Consider joining an Educon conversation and practice session to explore how we might grow ourselves and our learners through doodling and visual thinking.

This is a “do and dialogue” session. Together, we will experiment and prototype graphical, non-linear, low-res notes to listen deeply, capture big ideas, make creative connections, and strengthen comprehension and retention of important moments, learnings, and lessons.

We will begin with a quick convo about the “why and what” of sketch noting, share a bit about its impact at our schools, and on our own thinking and learning, then practice and learn together. We will doodle to a TED talk, doodle while we read, bravely share our work, and discuss how doodling can change peer-to-peer observations and feedback.

Resources to explore:

Shelley and I modeled doodling all 4 C’s with our collaboratively designed doodle of the Connect, Extend, Challenge Visible Thinking Routine, shown below.

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Cross posted at Finding the Signal.

Because I can’t see me…

I didn’t realize all of that was accomplished” was the reply after reading my observation notes of her class.

I hate when I learn that I’ve been walking around all day with the hem of my skirt out or with spinach in my teeth.  Don’t you? I am always grateful when someone tells me, because I can’t see me.

I watch John Vitarelli teach yoga on video, and I practice with him.  I know how it feels, but I cannot see me.  What if there is a minor adjustment that, if made, would make it easier, more impactful, and less stressful?

How might we serve one another? Learn from one another? Lend each other our eyes?

I didn’t realize all of that was accomplished.”
Because I can’t see me…