Tag Archives: Embedded Formative Assessment

productive struggle vs. thrashing blindly

The trick is to choose a goal just beyond your present abilities; to target the struggle. Thrashing blindly doesn’t help. Reaching does. (Coyle, 19 pag.)

What if we teach how to reach? How might we offer targeted struggle for every learner in our care?

SMP-1: Make Sense of Problems and Persevere #LL2LU

Investing time in teaching students how to learn is never wasted; in doing so, you deepen their understanding of the upcoming content and better equip them for future success. (Jackson, 19 pag.)

SMP-8: Look for and Express Regularity in Repeated Reasoning #LL2LU

If we are to harness the power of feedback to increase student learning, then we need to ensure that feedback causes a cognitive rather than an emotional reaction—in other words, feedback should cause thinking. It should be focused; it should relate to the learning goals that have been shared with the students; and it should be more work for the recipient than the donor. (Wiliam, 130 pag.)

Math Flexibility

When people believe their basic qualities can be developed, failures may still hurt, but failures don’t define them.   And if abilities can be expanded – if change and growth are possible – then there are still many paths to success.” (Dweck, 39 pag.)

What pathways to learning are illuminated in order to highlight learning = struggle + perseverance?


Coyle, Daniel (2009-04-16). The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. Random House, Inc. Kindle Edition.

Dweck, Carol S. Mindset: the New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House, 2006. 39. Print.

Jackson, Robyn R. (2010-07-27). How to Support Struggling Students (Mastering the Principles of Great Teaching series) (Pages 18-19). Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Kindle Edition.

Wiliam, Dylan (2011-05-01). Embedded Formative Assessment (Kindle Locations 2679-2681). Ingram Distribution. Kindle Edition.

Visual: SMP-8: look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning #LL2LU

Many students would struggle much less in school if, before we presented new material for them to learn, we took the time to help them acquire background knowledge and skills that will help them learn. (Jackson, 18 pag.)

We want every learner in our care to be able to say

I can look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
(CCSS.MATH.PRACTICE.MP8)

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But…what if I can’t? What if I have no idea what to look for, notice, take note of, or attempt to generalize?

Investing time in teaching students how to learn is never wasted; in doing so, you deepen their understanding of the upcoming content and better equip them for future success. (Jackson, 19 pag.)

Are we teaching for a solution, or are we teaching strategy to express patterns? What if we facilitate experiences where both are considered essential to learn?

We want more students to experience the burst of energy that comes from asking questions that lead to making new connections, feel a greater sense of urgency to seek answers to questions on their own, and reap the satisfaction of actually understanding more deeply the subject matter as a result of the questions they asked.  (Rothstein and Santana, 151 pag.)

What if we collaboratively plan questions that guide learners to think, notice, and question for themselves?

What do you notice? What changes? What stays the same?

Indeed, sharing high-quality questions may be the most significant thing we can do to improve the quality of student learning. (Wiliam, 104 pag.)

How might we design for, expect, and offer feedback on procedural fluency and conceptual understanding?

Level 4
I can attend to precision as I construct a viable argument to express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Level 3
I can look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Level 2
I can identify and describe patterns and regularities, and I can begin to develop generalizations.

Level 1
I can notice and note what changes and what stays the same when performing calculations or interacting with geometric figures.

If we are to harness the power of feedback to increase student learning, then we need to ensure that feedback causes a cognitive rather than an emotional reaction—in other words, feedback should cause thinking. It should be focused; it should relate to the learning goals that have been shared with the students; and it should be more work for the recipient than the donor. (Wiliam, 130 pag.)

[Cross posted on Easing the Hurry Syndrome]


Jackson, Robyn R. (2010-07-27). How to Support Struggling Students (Mastering the Principles of Great Teaching series) (Pages 18-19). Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Kindle Edition.

Rothstein, Dan, and Luz Santana. Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education, 2011. Print.

Wiliam, Dylan (2011-05-01). Embedded Formative Assessment (Kindle Locations 2679-2681). Ingram Distribution. Kindle Edition.

Our choices: Summer Reading 2013 – The Art of Questioning

My previous post, Summer Reading 2013 – Flyer and Choices, describes our summer reading plan and choices.  We offer choice of book and choice of platform, when available.  Here’s what and how we selected to read:

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My favorite new communication about faculty learning and our reading comes from Rhonda Mitchell (@rgmteach), an avid reader.

“Just so you know, I am putting my name on the list for Make Just One Change because I don’t have that book.  I’d like to participate in the Embedded formative assessment discussion.”

Awesome!

We have invited faculty to blog their notes and ideas on Flourish, our community blog.  The 4 As protocol will serve as our framework for note taking and discussion of the books when we return in the fall.  I think (and hope) that by sharing what we read on Flourish through the summer will encourage reading and will help with the fall discussions.

As far as instructional design goes, I’m now wondering if our teams for the book discussions should group readers of the same book or different books? Are we going to discuss the book or the art of questioning – or both?

Summer Reading 2013 – Flyer and Choices

How do we model learner choice? We know student-learners need and deserve differentiated learning opportunities.  Don’t all learners?

Last year, the teaching faculty read Cathy Davidson’s Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn, and the administrative faculty and staff read Seth Godin’s Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?. I read both.  Well…I listened to both as I ran using audiobooks and my phone.  After each run, I would annotate my notes into a physical book or my Kindle. To be clear, I read them by listening to the author read while I ran.

In 2013, we believe in learner choice, differentiation, leveraging technology, and so much more to help every learner grow. In a learning community, do we all need to read (or do) the same thing to learn?

From: Jill Gough
Date: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 4:21 AM
To: All Trinity
Cc: Leadership Team
Subject: Summer Reading 2013 – Flyer and Choices
.

Hi,

Please see the attached flyer about our summer reading choices.  The theme for this summer’s reading is the art of questioning.  Please select one of the books shown on the flyer for your summer reading and let us know your choice on or before May 10 by entering your selection on the Summer Reading Choice Google Formhttp://bit.ly/SummerRead2013. (This is a copy of the form; feel free to play with it.)

Last fall, faculty members suggested that it would be beneficial to have the 4 As protocol available while reading to take notes. I’ve attached a copy of this protocol if you would like to use it as an organizer for your notes. I plan to blog my notes as I read using the 4 As protocol as prompts to share with others.  You are invited and encouraged to blog on Flourish about your reading too.  And, if you microblog your comments and notes using Twitter to share what you are learning, would you please include the #TrinityLearns hash tag to help crowd source our notes?

Let me know if you have questions.

Thank you,

jill

Here’s the attached flyer:

And, our version of the 4 As protocol worksheet:

Our community commits to reading in the summer.  Readers may choose from five books about the art of questioning.  Readers may also choose to have their book delivered on paper, via Kindle, or iTunes audio.

While I’ve had several comments, I have two in writing that I want to share:

“I love the fact that we get to choose not only the book, but the way in which we choose to read it! Thank you!”

Awesome! And…

Thanks, Jill! I am really going out on a limb this summer and will do the reading on my iPad.

How important is it in our community or any community to have choice in learning? How do we support risk-taking in a supportive environment?