Category Archives: Sketch Notes

Traverse session: Experiential and Instructional: Promoting Productive Mathematical Struggle #tvrse18

At Traverse Boulder, I facilitated the following session on Tuesday, June 5, 2018.

Experiential and Instructional:
Promoting Productive Mathematical Struggle

How might we implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving to deepen conceptual understanding? Let’s identify and implement high quality tasks grounded in real experiences. Advancing the teaching and learning of mathematics cannot be accomplished with decontextualized worksheets. Discuss, sketch, and solve tasks that promote flexibility, creative and critical reasoning, and problem solving. Learning math should be anchored in depth of understanding through context – not pseudo context – and built on conceptual understanding as well as procedural fluency.

Here’s my sketch note of our plan:

Here’s the slide deck:

Just say no to worksheets.

Say YES to productive struggle and grappling.

Embolden your inner storyteller and leverage the art of questioning.

Context is key.

#KSULit2018: Mathematizing Read Alouds

At the 27th Annual KSU Conference on Literature for Children and Young Adults where the theme was Reimagining the Role of Children’s and Young Adult Literature, I presented the following 50-minute session on Tuesday, March 20, 2018.

Mathematizing Read Alouds

How might we deepen our understanding of numeracy using children’s literature? What if we mathematize our read-aloud books to use them in math as well as literacy? We invite you to notice and note, listen and learn, and learn by doing while we share ways to deepen understanding of numeracy and literacy.

Let’s debunk the myth that mathematicians do all work in their heads.  Mathematicians notice, wonder, note, identify patterns, ask questions, revise thinking, and share ideas.  Mathematicians show their thinking with details so that a reader understands without having to ask questions.

What if we pause during read-alouds to give learners a chance to analyze text features, to notice and wonder, to ask and answer questions in context?

How might we inspire and teach learners to make their thinking visible so that a reader understands?

Here’s my sketch note of the plan:

Here are more of the picture books highlighted in this session:

And, a list by approximate grade levels:

Early Learners, Pre-K, and Kindergarten

Kindergarten and 1st Grade

2nd, 3rd, 4th Grade

4th, 5th, 6th Grade

#MVIFI Collider session Sketchnoting: Show what you know more than one way

At the February 16th MVIFI Collider event for professional learning, I facilitated the following 50-minute session on sketch noting twice.

Sketchnoting:
Show what you know more than one way

Up your note taking skills by being visual. Learn this invaluable method for recording, showcasing understanding, and deepening comprehension.

We will meet and greet, norm, touch on research, play with words and word art, discuss tools, practice, participate in a feedback look, and close by setting a micro-goal.

Here’s my sketch note of the plan:

We watched Simon Sinek’s TED talk to practice live sketch noting.

Here are artifacts of learning from Twitter:

Instructional Core practice #WordsMatter How will we show we CARE?

As part of our school’s Pre-Planning, I facilitated a faculty-teams workshop to continue our work and learning in the Instructional Core.

Here are my notes from the session.

The agenda, shared ahead of the meeting, looked like this:

The slide deck that accompanies this plan looks like this:

We watched 4:05 minutes of Practice is Everything to renew and review our norms around teaming.

How we practice, how we team, makes a difference. The words we choose and use when offering feedback contribute to how our learners author their identity.  As we work to calibrate our expectations, we can also hone and enhance our ability to offer high-quality, positive, actionable feedback that empower learners to reach for their next independent level.

As seen in the slides, I used video timers to pace the teamwork time. What I learned is that the timers held me accountable for the work time promised to teachers.  I was forced to wait, to be patient, and to not rush. So helpful to hold the time for our teachers.

When we focus on learning,
we hold time for learners.

And, just as we carefully plan and hold time for learning, we carefully choose what we notice and note. Words matter; the story you tell impacts how a learner is thought of and seen.

Amanda Thomas (@TrinityMrsT) found and shared the video below. I used it in our session to illustrate the power of story.

As we begin a new school year with new learners, how will we seek a balanced story, describe what we want to see next, and balance our feedback to highlight success?

What story will we notice and note?
What feedback will we offer?
What will we contribute to how  learners author their identity?

How will we show we C.A.R.E.?

 

 

Lesson Study: different teachers, common lesson plan, guaranteed and viable curriculum

What if we share common mission and vision? How might we express our style, individuality, and personality while holding true to a plan and the essentials to learn?

My team, the Academic Leadership Team, includes the Head of School, both Division Heads, the Director of Curriculum, the Director of Technology, and me. We strategically plan using our agreed upon essential learnings.

Today, I had the honor and privilege of observing members of my team launch learning based on our goals and plans.  Can you see our connectedness, themes, and common language?

All School Meeting
with Joe Marshall, Head of SchoolJoeMarshallAug8-17

Early Elementary Division Meeting
with Rhonda Mitchell, Division Head

Upper Elementary Division Meeting
with Maryellen Berry, Division Head

How might we team to meet the needs of our diverse learners? What if teaching teams plan common lessons based on guaranteed and viable curriculum? And, what can we learn when we observe each other?

#BeTogetherNotTheSame
#GrowAndLearnTogether

Sketch notes from #TMC17 (a.k.a. Twitter Math Camp)

Becky Holden (@bholden86) and I attended Twitter Math Camp (#TMC17) at Holy Innocents Episcopal School in Atlanta, GA from Thursday, July 27 to Sunday, July 30.

This conference is by teachers, for teachers. The structure of TMC contains the following lengths of presentations:

  • Morning sessions (One session that meets Thursday, Friday and Saturday mornings for 2 hours each morning)
  • Afternoon sessions (Individual 1/2 hour sessions on Thursday)
  • Afternoon sessions (Individual 1 hour sessions Thursday, Friday and Saturday)

To honor Carl Oliver‘s (@carloliwitter) #PushSend request/challenge, here are my sketch notes from the sessions I attended.

Differentiating CCSS Algebra 1
— from drab to fab using Exeter Math 1 & Exploratory Talk
Elizabeth Statmore (@cheesemonkeysf)

The Politics(?) of Mathematics Teaching
Grace Chen (@graceachen)

What does it mean to say that mathematics teaching is political, and what does that mean for our moral and ethical responsibility as mathematics teachers?

Bridging elementary skills & concepts to high school & beyond
Glenn Waddell, Jr. (@gwaddellnvhs)

Micro-decisions in Questioning
David Petersen (@calcdave)

All I Really Need To Know I Learned From The MTBoS
…Not Really, But Close
Graham Fletcher (@gfletchy)

Hitting The Darn ‘Send’ Button
Carl Oliver (@carloliwitter)

Practical Ideas on the Kind of Coaching
We Need to Provide and Demand
Steve Leinwand (@steve_leinwand)

What is not captured in my notes is play: game night, trivia, crocheting, and tons of fun.

How might we grow, learn, and play in community when together and when apart?

Sketch notes from #TMC17 @Desmos pre-conference #descon17

I attended the TMC Desmos pre-conference at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School in Atlanta on July 26.

Below are my sketch notes from the session I attended.

Desmos and Assessment
Julie Reulbach (@jreulbach)

Principles for Building Activities
Michael Fenton (@mjfenton)

Keynote:
Annie Fetter (@MFAnnie)

Calculus for All
Chase Orton (mathgeek76)