Category Archives: Professional Development Plans

#NCTMLive #T3Learns Webinar: Establish Mathematics Goals to Focus Learning, and Elicit and Use Evidence of Student Thinking.

On Wednesday, March 28, 2018, Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828) and I co-facilitated the first webinar in a four-part series on the Eight Mathematics Teaching Practices from NCTM’s Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All.
        .
Establish Mathematics Goals to Focus Learning, and
Elicit and Use Evidence of Student Thinking.

Effective teaching of mathematics uses evidence of student thinking to assess progress toward mathematical understanding and to adjust instruction continually in ways that support and extend learning.

  • How might we communicate with clarity to ensure that learners are focused on high quality mathematical goals?
  • What types of tasks provide opportunities for learners to notice, note, wonder, and take action as agents of their own learning?
                 .
Our slide deck:
Agenda:
7:00 Opening remarks

  • Share your name and grade level(s) or course(s).
  • Norm setting and Purpose
7:05 Establish mathematics goals to focus learning #LL2LU

7:10 Let’s Do Some Math:  Illustrative Math – Fruit Salad?

7:25 Quotes from Taking Action
7:30 Elicit and use evidence of student thinking #LL2LU

7:35 Let’s Do Some Math

7:45 Elicit and use student thinking – Social-Emotional
Talking Points – Elizabeth Statmore

7:55 Close and preview next webinar in the series.

Implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving, and use and connect mathematical representations.

Some reflections from the chat window:
  • I learned to pay attention to how my students may first solve the problem or think about it prior to me teaching it to try and see connections that are made or how I can meet them. ~C Heikkila
  • I learned how to pay attention to how I introduce tasks to students. Sometimes I place limits on their responses by telling them what I expect to see in their responses as it relates to content topics. I will be more mindful about task introduction. ~M Roland
  • I learned to pay more attention to mathematical operations, and to look for more solutions that can satisfy the given problem. ~B Hakmi
  •  I also learned the importance of productive struggle and to be patient with my students. ~M James
  • I’m thinking about how to encourage my teachers to intentionally teach the mathematical practices. ~M Hite
  • I learned to pay attention to the learning progressions so I can think of the work as a process and journey. ~B Holden
  • A new mathematical connection for me was the idea of graphing values for the product example. ~A Warden
  • I learned to pay attention to peer discussions to discover how well students are learning the concepts. ~M Grech
  • Am I anticipating the roadblocks to learning? ~L Hendry

An audio recording of the webinar and the chat transcript can be viewed at NCTM’s Partnership Series page.

Cross posted at Easing the Hurry Syndrome

#KSULit2018: Mathematizing Read Alouds

At the 27th Annual KSU Conference on Literature for Children and Young Adults where the theme was Reimagining the Role of Children’s and Young Adult Literature, I presented the following 50-minute session on Tuesday, March 20, 2018.

Mathematizing Read Alouds

How might we deepen our understanding of numeracy using children’s literature? What if we mathematize our read-aloud books to use them in math as well as literacy? We invite you to notice and note, listen and learn, and learn by doing while we share ways to deepen understanding of numeracy and literacy.

Let’s debunk the myth that mathematicians do all work in their heads.  Mathematicians notice, wonder, note, identify patterns, ask questions, revise thinking, and share ideas.  Mathematicians show their thinking with details so that a reader understands without having to ask questions.

What if we pause during read-alouds to give learners a chance to analyze text features, to notice and wonder, to ask and answer questions in context?

How might we inspire and teach learners to make their thinking visible so that a reader understands?

Here’s my sketch note of the plan:

Here are more of the picture books highlighted in this session:

And, a list by approximate grade levels:

Early Learners, Pre-K, and Kindergarten

Kindergarten and 1st Grade

2nd, 3rd, 4th Grade

4th, 5th, 6th Grade

#T3IC: Using technology alongside #SlowMath to promote productive struggle

At the 2018 International T³ Conference in San Antonio, Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828) and I presented the following two hour power session.

Using technology alongside #SlowMath
to promote productive struggle

How might we shift classroom culture so that productive struggle is part of the norm? What if this same culture defines and embraces mistakes as opportunities to learn? One of the Mathematics Teaching Practices from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ (NCTM) “Principles to Actions” is to support productive struggle in learning mathematics. We want all learners to make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them. The tasks we select and facilitate must offer opportunities for each learner to develop connections and deepen their conceptual understanding.

Join us to learn more about #SlowMath opportunities that encourage students to persevere through challenging tasks instead of allowing their struggle become destructive. This session will address:

  • How might we provide #SlowMath opportunities for all students to notice and question?
  • How do activities that provide for visualization and conceptual development of mathematics help students think deeply about mathematical ideas and relationships?

Here’s the agenda:

8:30 Introductions
8:40 Intent and Purpose

  • Principles to Actions
  • #SlowMath
  • Norms (SMPs)
8:45 3-2-1 Bridge Visible Thinking Routine
8:50 Using Structure to Solve a Task – Circle-Square Task

9:55 3-2-1 Bridge Visible Thinking Routine

  • 2 questions around Productive Struggle (share one with partner and listen to one of partner)
10:00 Construct a Viable Argument to make your thinking visible:
Does (x+1)²=x²+1?

10:25 3-2-1 Bridge Visible Thinking Routine

  • In the chat, 1 analogy/metaphor/simile for Productive Struggle
10:30 Close

Here’s my sketch note of our plan:

Dave Johnston (@Johnston_MSMath) recorded his thinking and learning and shared it with us via Twitter.

And, a little more feedback from Twitter:

Cross posted on The Slow Math Movement

#T3IC Leading Learners to Level Up: Deepening Understanding of Mathematical Practices

At the 2018 International T³ Conference in San Antonio, Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828) and I presented the following 90-minute session. 

Leading Learners to Level Up:
Deepening Understanding of Mathematical Practices

We say: Persevere! Express regularity in repeated reasoning! Be precise! Show your work!… But what if I can’t yet? How might we make our thinking visible to empower our young learners to become self-correcting, self-reliant and independent? How do we coach – what strategies do we use – to help learners to embrace the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice? At the end of this session, participants should be able to say I can provide my learners leveled support on the Standards for Mathematical Practice on their journey towards mathematical proficiency. I can make my thinking visible to motivate learners to ask high quality questions. I can focus on the art of questioning and formative assessment tools to lead learners to level up.

Here’s the plan:

8:30
  1. Opening remarks
  2. Council (30 seconds each): Share your name, school and grade level(s) or course(s) with your table; How are you feeling this morning?
8:40 Make Sense of Tasks and Persevere Solving Them (SMP 1)

9:05 Look for & Make Use of Structure (SMP 7)

9:35 Look for & Express Regularity in Repeated Reasoning (SMP 8)

9:55 Goal setting: Back with my learners … Next steps

Here’s my sketch note of the plan for our session.

Dave Johnston (@Johnston_MSMath) recorded his thinking and learning and shared it with us via Twitter.

#MVIFI Collider session Sketchnoting: Show what you know more than one way

At the February 16th MVIFI Collider event for professional learning, I facilitated the following 50-minute session on sketch noting twice.

Sketchnoting:
Show what you know more than one way

Up your note taking skills by being visual. Learn this invaluable method for recording, showcasing understanding, and deepening comprehension.

We will meet and greet, norm, touch on research, play with words and word art, discuss tools, practice, participate in a feedback look, and close by setting a micro-goal.

Here’s my sketch note of the plan:

We watched Simon Sinek’s TED talk to practice live sketch noting.

Here are artifacts of learning from Twitter:

Change the world; pick up your pen. #EmboldenYourInnerWriter

“If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write.” Martin Luther

“Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” Mahatma Gandhi

How might we learn and share, to spread what works well and promotes positive outcomes for learners? If we find that learners are making leaps in knowledge, confidence, and efficacy, how will we share our success with others?

Doing work that inspires growth, courage, and risk-taking in one classroom serves learners and opens pathways of success. What if we share with a broader, connected audience?

“If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write.” Martin Luther

#LearnAndShare

#EmboldenYourInnerWriter

Embolden Your Inner Mathematician: week 7 agenda

Implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving.

Effective teaching of mathematics engages students in solving and discussing tasks that promote mathematical reasoning and problem solving and allow multiple entry points and varied solution strategies.

Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All

Slide deck

15 min Homework discussion, Q&A,
Problem of the Week
15 min Number talk and
birthday breakfast
45 min Numeracy through Literature –
Notice and Note

Those Darn Squirrels!

35 min

 

Designing for Learning

Read, select, and design –
anticipate and connect

  • Read and discuss
  • Brainstorm important concepts and
    anticipate how learners will think and
    share using Post-it notes
  • Connect to essential learnings or skills
10 min Closure
End of session

Possibilities:

Learning Progressions:

  • I can demonstrate mathematical flexibity to show what I know more than one way.
  • I can show my work so that a reader understands without asking questions.

Standards for Mathematical Practice

  • I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them.

  • I can construct a viable argument and critique the reasoning of others.

“Connect Extend Challenge A Routine for Connecting New Ideas to Prior Knowledge.” Visible Thinking, Harvard Project Zero.

Leinwand, Steve. Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All. Reston, VA.: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2014. (p. 46) Print.

Gough, Jill, and Jennifer Wilson. “#LL2LU Learning Progressions: SMP.” Experiments in Learning by Doing or Easing the Hurry Syndrome. WordPress, 04 Aug. 2014. Web. 11 Mar. 2017.

Gough, Jill, and Kato Nims. “#LL2LU Learning Progressions.” Experiments in Learning by Doing or Colorful Learning. WordPress, 04 Aug. 2014. Web. 11 Mar. 2017.

Smith, Margaret Schwan., et al. Taking Action: Implementing Effective Mathematics Teaching Practices in Grades K-5. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2017.


Previous Embolden Your Inner Mathematician agendas: