Category Archives: Professional Development Plans

Goal Work: design and implement a differentiated action plan

As an Academic Leadership Team, Maryellen BerryRhonda MitchellMarsha Harris, and I continue to work on our common goal.

By the end of this year, all teachers should be able to say We can design and implement a differentiated action plan across our grade to meet all learners where they are.

To highlight our commitment to empowering learners to act as agents of their own learning, we continue to share the following progression as a pathway for teams to learn and stretch.

You can see our previous plans here and here. For today’s Wednesday Workshop, we only had about 45 minutes to work and learn together.  As the Academic Leadership Team, we asked ourselves how we might make time for faculty to learn in targeted ways?  We challenged ourselves to model what we want to see from our faculty. So today’s goal is

We can design and implement a differentiated action plan across our divisions to meet all teacher-learners where they are.

Here is the big picture for our plan.Here are the details from the Pre-K – 6th literacy PD:

Here are the details for Early Leaners PD: Here are the details for Math PD:

Teachers of Specials and Learning Team also had different learning plans to differentiate for our readers and the social-emotional and character building work.

We hope our faculty can see that we strive to serve as their teacher team and that we embrace the norm be together, not the same.

We can design and implement a differentiated action plan across our grade to meet all learners where they are.

We can design and implement a differentiated action plan across our divisions to meet all learners where they are.

Sneak peek: Leading Mathematics Education in the Digital Age

Leading Mathematics Education in the Digital Age
2017 NCSM Annual Conference
Pre-Conference Session
Sunday, April 2, 2017 from 1:00-5:00 p.m.
Jennifer Wilson
Jill Gough

How can leaders effectively lead mathematics education in the era of the digital age? There are many ways to contribute in our community and the global community, but we have to be willing to offer our voices. How might we take advantage of instructional tools to purposefully ensure that all students and teachers have voice: voice to share what we know and what we don’t know yet; voice to wonder what if and why; voice to lead and to question.

Sneak peek for our session includes:

How might we strengthen our flexibility to make sense and persevere? What if we deepen understanding to show what we know more than one way?

Interested? Here’s a sneak peek at a subset of our slides as they exist today. Disclaimer: Since this is a draft, the slides may change before we see you in San Antonio.

I wonder what Jennifer’s sneak peek looks like? Do you?

Read, apply, learn

Read, apply, learn
`2017 T³™ International Conference
Saturday, March 11, 8:30 – 10 a.m.
Columbus H, East Tower, Ballroom Level
Jennifer Wilson
Jill Gough

How might we take action on current best practices and research in learning and assessment? What if we make sense of new ideas and learn how to apply them in our own practice? Let’s learn together; deepen our understanding of formative assessment; make our thinking visible; push ourselves to be more flexible; and more. We will explore some of the actions taken while tinkering with ideas from Tim Kanold, Dylan Wiliam, Jo Boaler and others, and we will discuss and share their impact on learning.

[Cross posted at Easing The Hurry Syndrome]

Deep practice: building conceptual understanding in the middle grades

Deep practice:
building conceptual understanding in the middle grades
2017 T³™ International Conference
Friday, March 10, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Dusable, West Tower, Third Floor
Jill Gough
Jennifer Wilson

How might we attend to comprehension, accuracy, flexibility and then efficiency? What if we leverage technology to enhance our learners’ visual literacy and make connections between words, pictures and numbers? We will look at new ways of using technology to help learners visualize, think about, connect and discuss mathematics. Let’s explore how we might help young learners productively struggle instead of thrashing around blindly.

[Cross posted at Easing The Hurry Syndrome]

Goal work: learn more math, study the Practices

The math committee met this week to work on our goals. We agreed that, for the rest of this school year, we would spend half of our time on learning more math and the other half studying to learn more about the Standards For Mathematical Practice.

We met this week to learn more math and to discuss Chapter 1, Mathematical 1: Make Sense of Problems and Persevere in Solving Them in Beyond Answers: Exploring Mathematical Practices with Young Children by Mike Flynn.

Yearlong Goals:

  • We can learn more math.
  • We can share work with grade level teams to grow our whole community as teachers of math.
  • We can deepen our understanding of the Standards For Mathematical Practice.

Today’s Goals:

  • I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them.
  • I can reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • I can look for and make use of structure.

Resources:

Learning Plan

3:05 5 min Quick scan of Jo’s YouCubed article (pp. 2, 11)
3:05 20 min Solving equations visually to make sense of the algebra
(Learn more math)

productive-struggle-4 productive-struggle-3

3:25 5 min Book Club warm-up

3:30 20 min Use Visible Thinking Routines to guide discussion of Chapter One: Make Sense and Persevere
(deepen our understanding of the SMPs.)

3:55 5 min Feedback – “I learned…, “I liked…,”I felt…

Read Chapter 2: Reason Abstractly and Quantitatively

Update on PD (Goal: Scale our work to our teams.)

When we set purposeful team goals, we help each other make progress, and we use our time intentionally.


Flynn, Michael. Beyond Answers: Exploring Mathematical Practices with Young Children. Portland, Maine.: Stenhouse, 2017. Print.

Van de Walle, John. Teaching Student-centered Mathematics: Developmentally Appropriate Instruction for Grades Pre-K-2. Boston: Pearson, 2014. Print.

PD planning: #Mathematizing Read Alouds

How might we deepen our understanding of numeracy using children’s literature? What if we mathematize our read aloud books to use them in math as well as reading and writing workshop?

Have you read Love Monster and the last Chocolate from Rachel Bright?

Becky Holden and I planned the following professional learning session to build common understanding and language as we expand our knowledge of teaching numeracy through literature.  Each Early Learners, Pre-K, and Kindergarten math teacher participated in 2.5-hours of professional learning over the course of the day.

screen-shot-2017-02-10-at-5-12-49-pm

To set the purpose and intentions for our work together we shared the following:

screen-shot-2017-01-15-at-8-35-21-am screen-shot-2017-01-15-at-8-35-31-am

Becky’s lesson plan for Love Monster and the last Chocolate is shown below:

lovemonsterlessonplan

After reading the story, we asked teacher-learners what they wondered and what they wanted to know more about.  After settling on a wondering, we asked our teacher-learners to use pages from the book to anticipate how their young learners might answer their questions.

After participating in a gallery walk to see each other’s methods, strategies, and representations, we summarized the ways children might tackle this task. We decided we were looking for

  • counts each one
  • counts to tell how many
  • counts out a particular quantity
  • keeps track of an unorganized pile
  • one-to-one correspondence
  • subitizing
  • comparing

When we are intentional about anticipating how learners may answer, we are more prepared to ask advancing and assessing questions as well as pushing and probing questions to deepen a child’s understanding.

If a ship without a rudder is, by definition, rudderless, then formative assessment without a learning progression often becomes plan-less. (Popham,  Kindle Locations 355-356)

Here’s the Kindergarten learning progression for I can compare groups to 10.

Level 4:
I can compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

Level 3:
I can identify whether the number of objects (1-10) in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group by using matching and counting strategies.

Level 2:
I can use matching strategies to make an equivalent set.

Level 1:
I can visually compare and use the use the comparing words greater than/less than, more than/fewer than, or equal to (or the same as).

Here’s the Pre-K  learning progression for I can keep track of an unorganized pile.

Level 4:
I can keep track of more than 12 objects.

Level 3:
I can easily keep track of objects I’m counting up to 12.

Level 2:
I can easily keep track of objects I’m counting up to 8.

Level 1:
I can begin to keep track of objects in a pile but may need to recount.

How might we team to increase our own understanding, flexibility, visualization, and assessment skills?

Teachers were then asked to move into vertical teams to mathematize one of the following books by reading, wondering, planning, anticipating, and connecting to their learning progressions and trajectories.

During the final part of our time together, they returned to their base-classroom teams to share their books and plans.

After the session, I received this note:

Hi Jill – I /we really loved today. Would you want to come and read the Chocolate Monster book to our kids and then we could all do the math activities we did as teachers? We have math most days at 11:00, but we could really do it when you have time. We usually read the actual book, but I loved today having the book read from the Kindle (and you had awesome expression!).

Thanks again for today – LOVED it.

How might we continue to plan PD that is purposeful, actionable, and implementable?


Cross posted on Connecting Understanding.


Hattie, John A. (Allan); Fisher, Douglas B.; Frey, Nancy; Gojak, Linda M.; Moore, Sara Delano; Mellman, William L. (2016-09-16). Visible Learning for Mathematics, Grades K-12: What Works Best to Optimize Student Learning (Corwin Mathematics Series). SAGE Publications. Kindle Edition.

Norris, Kit; Schuhl, Sarah (2016-02-16). Engage in the Mathematical Practices: Strategies to Build Numeracy and Literacy With K-5 Learners (Kindle Locations 4113-4115). Solution Tree Press. Kindle Edition.

Popham, W. James. Transformative Assessment in Action: An Inside Look at Applying the Process (Kindle Locations 355-356). Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Kindle Edition.

Teaming: Deepen Understanding to Strengthen Academic Foundation part 2

How might we learn and grow together? How do we connect ideas and engage in productive, purposeful  learning experiences (aka professional development) around common mission, vision, and goals? What if we model what we want to see and experience in our classrooms?

Continuing to work on our common goal, Maryellen BerryRhonda MitchellMarsha Harris, and I facilitated a half day learning session for base classroom teachers.

In August, we introduced our goal for teacher-learners and began our work and learning with the faculty.
screen-shot-2017-03-04-at-7-52-14-am

Throughout the semester, we have been working with teacher-teams in many ways. We hope our faculty notice how we are modeling be together, not the same  taught during Pre-Planning. We have worked and learned with teams to design and implement common assessments and analyze the results to understand what students know in reading, writing, and mathematics.

screen-shot-2017-03-04-at-7-52-02-am

Based on our observations and conferring with teams and individual teachers, we know that we are ready to move to the next level of our work.  Here is a copy of our plan:

Goal:

We can design and implement a differentiated action plan across our grade to meet all learners where they are.

9:00 Intro to Purpose:  Instructional Core: Relationship between content, teacher, student

  • Brightspot observed Instructional Core teamwork
9:30 Movement to Grade Level Teams and spaces
9:35

15 min

40 min

45 min

Analyze Student Work Together (a la Norming Meeting)

  • Use PAST assessment (Pre-K), Founts & Pinnell winter running records (K-6th) as common assessment.
  • Sort student records (1-4) using TCRWP Benchmark Reading Levels and Marking Periods and identify at least one teaching point for each learner (on a Post-it on the folder)
  • Partner up to do a deep dive into one of the levels
  • Using the Continuum of Literacy, note and note the following
  • Develop a plan for this level of reading and the necessary strategy groups
11:25 Q&A and transition
11:30 Closure: Planning, Reflection, Next Steps

Here’s what it looked like:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As we learn more about our learners, we are better equipped to help them as they learn and grow.

Based on outcomes from today, Maryellen, Marsha, Rhonda, and I will adjust our pacing guide and plans to find more time for teachers to do this important learning.

We can design and implement a differentiated action plan across our grade divisions to meet all learners where they are.