Tag Archives: NCSM

Sneak peek: Leading Mathematics Education in the Digital Age

Leading Mathematics Education in the Digital Age
2017 NCSM Annual Conference
Pre-Conference Session
Sunday, April 2, 2017 from 1:00-5:00 p.m.
Jennifer Wilson
Jill Gough

How can leaders effectively lead mathematics education in the era of the digital age? There are many ways to contribute in our community and the global community, but we have to be willing to offer our voices. How might we take advantage of instructional tools to purposefully ensure that all students and teachers have voice: voice to share what we know and what we don’t know yet; voice to wonder what if and why; voice to lead and to question.

Sneak peek for our session includes:

How might we strengthen our flexibility to make sense and persevere? What if we deepen understanding to show what we know more than one way?

Interested? Here’s a sneak peek at a subset of our slides as they exist today. Disclaimer: Since this is a draft, the slides may change before we see you in San Antonio.

I wonder what Jennifer’s sneak peek looks like? Do you?

NCSM 2016: Sketch notes for learning

NCSM 2016 National Conference – BUILDING BRIDGES BETWEEN LEADERSHIP AND LEARNING MATHEMATICS:  Leveraging Education Innovation and Research to Inspire and Engage

Below are my notes from each session that I attended and a few of the lasting takeaways.

Day One


Keith Devlin‘s keynote was around gaming for learning. He highlighted the difference in doing math and learning math.  I continue to ponder worthy work to unlock potential.  How often do we expect learners to be able to write as soon as they learn? If we connect this to music, reading, and writing, we know that symbolic representations comes after thinking and understanding.  Hmm…Apr_11_NCSM-Devlin

The Illustrative Mathematics team challenged us to learn together: learn more about our students, learn more about our content, learn more about essentials for our grade and the grades around us.  How might we learn a lot together?

Conference Sketch Note - 25

Graham Fletcher teamed with Arjan Khalsa. While the title was Digital Tools and Three-Act Tasks: Marriage Made in the Cloud, the elegant pedagogy and intentional teacher moves modeled to connect 3-act tasks to Smith/Stein’s 5 Practices was masterful.
Conference Sketch Note - 26

Jennifer Wilson‘s #SlowMath movement calls for all to S..L..O..W d..o..w..n and savor the mathematics. Notice and note what changes and what stays the same; look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning; deepen understanding through and around productive struggle. Time is a variable; learning is the constant.  Embrace flexibility and design for learning.

Conference Sketch Note - 27

Bill McCallum challenges us to mix memory AND understanding.  He used John Masefield’s Sea Fever to highlight the need for both. Memorization is temporary; learners must make sense and understand to transfer to long-term memory.  How might we connect imagery and poetry of words to our discipline? What if we teach multiple representations as “same story, different verse”?

Conference Sketch Note - 28

Uri Treisman connects Carol Dweck’s mindsets work to nurturing students’ mathematical competence.  Learners persist more often when they have a positive view of their struggle. How might we bright spot learners’ work and help them deepen their sense of belonging in our classrooms and as mathematicians?

Conference Sketch Note - 29

Day Two


Jennifer Wilson shared James Popham’s stages of formative assessment in a school community. How might we learn and plan together? What if our team meetings focus on the instructional core, the relationships between learners, teachers, and the content?

Conference Sketch Note - 30

Michelle Rinehart asks about our intentional leadership moves.  How are we serving our learners and our colleagues as a growth advocate? Do we bright spot the work of others as we learn from them? What if we team together to target struggle, to promote productive struggle, and to persevere? Do we reflect on our leadership moves?

Conference Sketch Note - 31

Karim Ani asked how often we offered tasks that facilitate learning where math is used to understand the world.  How might we reflect on how often we use the world to learn about math and how often we use math to understand the world in which we live? Offer learners relevance.

Conference Sketch Note - 32

Day Three


Zac Champagne started off the final day of #NCSM16 with 10 lessons for teacher-learners informed from practice through research. How might we listen to learn what our learners already know? What if we blur assessment and instruction together to learn more about our learners and what they already know?

Conference Sketch Note - 33

Eli Luberoff and Kim Sadler created social chatter that matters using Desmos activities that offered learners the opportunities to ask and answer questions in pairs.  How might we leverage both synchronous and asynchronous communication to give learners voice and “hear” them?

Conference Sketch Note - 34

Fred Dillon and Melissa Boston facilitated a task to highlight NCTM’s Principles to Actions ToolKit to promote productive struggle.  This connecting, for me, to the instructional core.  How might we design intentional learning episodes that connect content, process and teacher moves? How might we persevere to promote productive struggle? We take away productive struggle opportunities for learners when we shorten our wait time and tell.

Conference Sketch Note - 35

JGough observes JWilson – #NCSM14 Developing Conceptual Understanding Through the Progressions

Peer-to-Peer Observations…who learns?

Everyone.

Piloting an Observation of Practice with Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828), I observed Jennifer during our NCSM presentation, Developing a Conceptual Understanding of Fractions. Below is a record of what I observed and then my reflection.  I am grateful for the opportunity to observe Jennifer and to learn from and with her.


Jill Gough observes Jennifer Wilson
NCSM: Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 10:00 – 11:00, New Orleans, LA
Session:  Developing Conceptual Understanding Through the Progressions:  Fractions, Ratios, and Proportions

Observation:


Jennifer began her session with Essential Learnings for the hour.  By the end of this session, everyone should be able to say:

  • I can describe a fraction a/b as a copies of 1/b.
  • I can construct questions that push and probe student thinking about questions.
  • I can explain the role that technology plays in deepening student understanding of fractions.

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 5.29.57 PM

I like that Jennifer began her session this way, because it offered participants focus and direction. I wonder if the audience appreciated this intentional guiding of thinking.  I like that there was a content essential learning, an assessment essential learning, and a process essential learning.  What if all PD lessons were launched this way? I wonder if we would see more engagement and thought and less nervousness about which button to press.

I appreciated the situation Jennifer experienced with technology as the session began.  The same situation happened to me in Sacramento a couple of weeks ago.  After playing her PowerPoint slide, Jennifer returned to the Navigator software to find all the traditionally black text was now white making is difficult to read.  In addition, when she returned to the slideshow, it was frozen.  (Same for me in Sacramento, but I was using Keynote.)

I like that Jennifer pressed forward, abandoning her slide deck to keep the conversation going with the participants.  I wonder how she would handle this in such a short session if she was presenting alone.

I liked the formative assessment question sent via quick poll to engage the audience right away.  While I was not quick enough to capture the results, they were varied. Each choice had some takers.  I liked the use a warm-up question using the Navigator. I liked that Jennifer took action based on the results.  Good modeling.  I liked that the Navigator was used as a tool and that fractions were the featured event that anchored the discussion.

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 5.30.20 PM

I love watching Jennifer facilitate peer-to-peer discourse, because she requires individual thinking time prior to group discussion.  I aspire to use her protocol. I need this when I am learning. What if we established this as a goal or must do for all instructors?

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 5.30.40 PM

Jennifer used the following files during her session:

Using appropriate wait time, Jennifer offered hands-on experience and investigation time for participants to explore each of the files.  She prompted participants to shoulder-partner up and brainstorm push and probe questions that might be asked of students.  Jennifer used the Navigator to capture class responses to comment on and visualize quality questions from the audience and the authors.  I like that she modeled push and probe questioning through this discussion.  She honored participant questions and offered advancing questions to help push their thinking.

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 5.31.17 PM

I observed participants struggle with what questions to ask and what response to hope for from learners.  One participant said “I don’t know how to explain these true/false questions.  I know which ones are true and which are false, but how do I explain in words?” Evidence of probing for understanding and that thinking was being pushed.  I liked that I had the opportunity to witness and then facilitate peer-to-peer discourse as these teacher-learners grappled with the why of fractions.  I wonder if we should incorporate the 5-whys protocol and theWhat Makes You Say That Visible Thinking Routine to facilitate rich discussion and uncover possible misconceptions.

Using the Navigator class capture, Jennifer complimented the audience on their approaches to Fractions and Unit Squares and that none of their methods were the way she thought.  “My students continually surprise me. You too!” I like that she modeled her way only after showing several correct ways.

Jennifer closed by returning to the Essential Learnings to remind participants of their experience and what the target was for the session.

Jill’s reflection:


 As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, which aspects of my teaching do I feel are bright spots?

I like starting sessions with Essential Learnings written as I can… statements.  Observing Jennifer launch and close her session with the I can… statements was the first time I’ve seen someone other than me leverage them in a professional development session.  In my own practice, I send the agenda ahead of the session when possible. I wonder if I should declare them as the beginning of the session. I thought it was a powerful anchor for our work.

I like starting with a warm-up question that turned into formative assessment.  In my own practice, I have intentionally described how I am shifting gears based on a warm-up question to model adjusting (not abandoning) the plan to meet learners where they are.  I wonder how many teacher-learners miss the adjustment when we are not direct about the shift we are making.  At the Social Media PD Saturday, Sam commented on the shifts I made based on the learners’ questions and the fact that I still accomplished everything on the plan.  What if we are more intentional when we shift to make the shift transparent? Based on these results, we are going to shift to X, and we will get to our destination. This connects to Jo Boalers’ I am giving you this feedback because I believe in you. What if we are direct? I/we are shifting the plan because we need to do X to accomplish XX.

I like using the Navigator to highlight multiple pathways to success.  I appreciated Jennifer using the Navigator to intentionally highlight more than one way to accomplish a task.  I wonder if zooming in to show 2 screens from the class capture helps participants sitting in the back to see.  What if we regularly and intentionally honor work by showing multiple correct pathways?

As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, what questions do I have about my own teaching?

I wonder how to include more participants when using the Navigator.  At Jennifer’s session, there were 30 handhelds and 40 participants.  I wonder how to engage all participants. Do we need more resources? Should we partner? I want to try more participants connected to Navigator in my work with large groups.  Even though every participant (40-90 participants) had a handheld, we observed those not connected and displayed were less engaged.

What if I am more intentional about Think-Team-Share? I appreciated Jennifer’s direct and intentional let’s take 30-60 seconds to organize our thoughts silently before sharing. What if I add this to my facilitation toolkit? What if I add let’s take a minute to quick-write. Describe your thinking on paper to offer a visual of your idea when sharing with others. How might I model this as a strategy for any learning episode?

As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, what new ideas do have?

Well, one is in the paragraph above.  “What if I add this to my facilitation toolkit? What if I add let’s take a minute to quick-write? Describe your thinking on paper to offer a visual of your idea when sharing with others. How might I model this as a strategy for any learning episode?” I hear myself talk about teaching learners visual note taking, but do I model it for teacher-learners? What if I write a blog post that show what is in my head so that it is clearer to me and to others?

I am inspired to work on my closings.  I like how Jennifer cycled back to the Essential Learning for the session to have participants do a quick mental self-assessment.  I believe the way she closed the session improved the chances that the message will stick.


[Cross posted at Easing the Hurry Syndrome]