Tag Archives: Becky Holden

PD planning: #Mathematizing Read Alouds

How might we deepen our understanding of numeracy using children’s literature? What if we mathematize our read aloud books to use them in math as well as reading and writing workshop?

Have you read Love Monster and the last Chocolate from Rachel Bright?

Becky Holden and I planned the following professional learning session to build common understanding and language as we expand our knowledge of teaching numeracy through literature.  Each Early Learners, Pre-K, and Kindergarten math teacher participated in 2.5-hours of professional learning over the course of the day.

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To set the purpose and intentions for our work together we shared the following:

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Becky’s lesson plan for Love Monster and the last Chocolate is shown below:

lovemonsterlessonplan

After reading the story, we asked teacher-learners what they wondered and what they wanted to know more about.  After settling on a wondering, we asked our teacher-learners to use pages from the book to anticipate how their young learners might answer their questions.

After participating in a gallery walk to see each other’s methods, strategies, and representations, we summarized the ways children might tackle this task. We decided we were looking for

  • counts each one
  • counts to tell how many
  • counts out a particular quantity
  • keeps track of an unorganized pile
  • one-to-one correspondence
  • subitizing
  • comparing

When we are intentional about anticipating how learners may answer, we are more prepared to ask advancing and assessing questions as well as pushing and probing questions to deepen a child’s understanding.

If a ship without a rudder is, by definition, rudderless, then formative assessment without a learning progression often becomes plan-less. (Popham,  Kindle Locations 355-356)

Here’s the Kindergarten learning progression for I can compare groups to 10.

Level 4:
I can compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

Level 3:
I can identify whether the number of objects (1-10) in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group by using matching and counting strategies.

Level 2:
I can use matching strategies to make an equivalent set.

Level 1:
I can visually compare and use the use the comparing words greater than/less than, more than/fewer than, or equal to (or the same as).

Here’s the Pre-K  learning progression for I can keep track of an unorganized pile.

Level 4:
I can keep track of more than 12 objects.

Level 3:
I can easily keep track of objects I’m counting up to 12.

Level 2:
I can easily keep track of objects I’m counting up to 8.

Level 1:
I can begin to keep track of objects in a pile but may need to recount.

How might we team to increase our own understanding, flexibility, visualization, and assessment skills?

Teachers were then asked to move into vertical teams to mathematize one of the following books by reading, wondering, planning, anticipating, and connecting to their learning progressions and trajectories.

During the final part of our time together, they returned to their base-classroom teams to share their books and plans.

After the session, I received this note:

Hi Jill – I /we really loved today. Would you want to come and read the Chocolate Monster book to our kids and then we could all do the math activities we did as teachers? We have math most days at 11:00, but we could really do it when you have time. We usually read the actual book, but I loved today having the book read from the Kindle (and you had awesome expression!).

Thanks again for today – LOVED it.

How might we continue to plan PD that is purposeful, actionable, and implementable?


Cross posted on Connecting Understanding.


Hattie, John A. (Allan); Fisher, Douglas B.; Frey, Nancy; Gojak, Linda M.; Moore, Sara Delano; Mellman, William L. (2016-09-16). Visible Learning for Mathematics, Grades K-12: What Works Best to Optimize Student Learning (Corwin Mathematics Series). SAGE Publications. Kindle Edition.

Norris, Kit; Schuhl, Sarah (2016-02-16). Engage in the Mathematical Practices: Strategies to Build Numeracy and Literacy With K-5 Learners (Kindle Locations 4113-4115). Solution Tree Press. Kindle Edition.

Popham, W. James. Transformative Assessment in Action: An Inside Look at Applying the Process (Kindle Locations 355-356). Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Kindle Edition.

#NCTMRegionals Day 1 notes

Sharing my day one notes from the NCTM Regional Conference in Philadelphia:

Peg Cagle: Teacher Leadership – Advocating for ourselves, our students, our profession.

“The difference between listening and pretending to listen, I discovered, is enormous. One is fluid, the other is rigid. One is alive, the other is stuffed. Eventually, I found a radical way of thinking about listening. Real listening is a willingness to let the other person change you. When I’m willing to let them change me, something happens between us that’s more interesting than a pair of dueling monologues.” – Alan Alda

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Becky Holden: Building Understanding – Meeting Students Where They Are

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Kristin Gray: Lesson Planning That Begins with Student Thinking
nctmregional2016-mathminds

Mashup: #5Practices and #WODB

What if we engage in purposeful instructional talk as a team to focus on the instructional core? How might we design and implement a differentiated action plan across our grade to meet all learners where they are? What if we learn to integrate Smith and Stein’s 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions?

Becky Holden (@bholden86), our EED math specialist, and I are working on formative assessment using anticipate and monitor, the first two of Smith and Stein’s 5 Practices.  While we don’t want a template, we keep using this sketch to plan, think, and share.

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It’s still a work in progress.  We’d love to know what you think.

Brian Toth (@btoth4thgrade) shared his learners and time with me so that I could play and work with our students on SMP-6, attend to precision.

The following three sketches are the notes and jots of what we anticipate our learners will think and say prior to the start of class.

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Our purposeful instructional talk set learning goals of I can attend to precision, and I can demonstrate flexibility to show what I know more than one way.  From our students, we are looking for complete sentences with strong vocabulary and word choice.  We want to see internal motivation to think deeply and a willingness to go past a surface initial answer. We know that we are growing toward constructing viable arguments. From our team, we are collaborating to learn more about our learners, to become more flexible ourselves, and to notice and note details of student answers so that we can design and implement a differentiated action plan across our grade to meet all learners where they are.

Toth-wodb

What if we learn and practice together? How might we grow in confidence, competence, precision, and flexibility?