Tag Archives: Becky Holden

Book study: #ChoralCounting and #CountingCollections – session 2 #TrinityLearns

As a community, we are focused on high-quality instruction that leads to deep understanding.  The teachers of our youngest learners take action to develop young, strong mathematicians.  Together, we are studying Choral Counting and Counting Collections: Transforming the PreK-5 Math Classroom to deepen and strengthen our understanding of learning and teaching early numeracy.

Counting is a vibrant part of early learning about mathematics. Young children are constantly counting as they make sense of their world. [Franke, Kindle Locations 490-491}

For our second session together, we turned our attention to choral counting and what we learn when we listen to the diverse thinking of the learners in the room.  As you can see from the tweets below, our teachers are working with our young students to confirm a sense of belonging while strengthening our culture of being seen, known, and heard by teachers and peers.

Choral Counting gets to the heart of what we want for our mathematical communities. This activity creates space for all students to notice, to wonder, and to pursue interesting ideas. Students and teachers alike wonder together about patterns, and why and how numbers change or stay the same. [Franke, Kindle Locations1526-1528}

In addition to deeper work with choral counting, we continue to empower young learners to count, record, and think.

Learning about counting and cardinality are big ideas in the early grades. Having a collection of items invites children to count to find the total number of objects. As children count, they come to understand the relationship between numbers and quantities and connect counting to cardinality. [Franke, Kindle Locations 501-503}

How do we strengthen and deepen understanding, confidence, and efficacy? Who do we help when learners persevere, show their work, and . . . ? What are ways to empower learners to become self-correcting, self-reliant, and independent?

#TrinityLearns


Franke, Megan L. Choral Counting and Counting Collections: Transforming the PreK-5 Math Classroom.. Stenhouse. Kindle Edition.

Book study: #ChoralCounting and #CountingCollections – session 1 #TrinityLearns

In Making a Case for ‘Timely, Purposeful, Progressive’ PD, Brian Curtin writes

Want to maximize professional-development opportunities? Provide specific content that suits teachers’ most pressing needs—when they need it most. In order to ensure relevancy, teachers must be able to use the new insights they’ve gained right away.

As a community, we are focused on high-quality instruction that leads to deep understanding.  The teachers of our youngest learners take action to develop young, strong mathematicians.  Together, we are studying Choral Counting and Counting Collections: Transforming the PreK-5 Math Classroom to deepen and strengthen our understanding of learning and teaching early numeracy.

Prior to our first meeting on February 4, 2019, 16 teachers and administrators committed to learning together by studying the first chapter of Choral Counting and Counting Collections.  The plan for the Feb. 4 meeting is shown at the end of this post and included time to discuss what we read as well as practice together.

We started with this collection.

And ended up with this:

How might we anticipate ways students will show their thinking and record their work?

Were teachers able to use the new insights they’ve gained right away?

The authors of Choral Counting and Counting Collections: Transforming the PreK-5 Math Classroom tell us:

These activities help us enact our commitments to equity. We know that a sense of belonging and investment, of being seen, known, and heard by teachers and classmates, is fundamental to creating schools where children and families feel welcome and where they flourish. Because these activities foreground student sense making and cultivate a joy for doing mathematics, they can be powerful tools for teachers to counter narrow views that only a few can identify with mathematics or that mathematics is disconnected from students’ home lives, their communities, and their own interests.

We are motivated and driven to learn more so that we continue to serve our young learners in the spirit of our mission and vision:

Trinity School creates a community of learners in a diverse and distinctly elementary-only environment, in which each child develops the knowledge, skills, and character to achieve his or her unique potential as a responsible, productive, and compassionate member of the School and greater community.

Celebrating the present and preparing our students for the future within a nurturing and caring educational environment, we:

  • Cherish Childhood
  • Deepen Students’ Educational Experience
  • Empower Students in Their Learning

So that our students:

  • Build Academic Foundation
  • Develop Character Foundation
  • Exhibit Continued Curiosity, Creativity, and Confidence


Curtin, Brian. “Making a Case for ‘Timely, Purposeful, Progressive’ PD.” Education Week Teacher, Education Week, 19 Feb. 2019, www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2017/12/06/making-a-case-for-timely-purposeful-progressive.html.

Franke, Meghan L., et al. Choral Counting and Counting Collections: Transforming the PreK-5 Math Classroom. Stenhouse Publishers, 2018.

Overview: Embolden Your Inner Mathematician

Taking action on known national goals, 15 Trinity School teacher-learner-leaders will begin a semester-long professional learning journey to deepen our understanding of NCTM’s Effective Mathematics Teaching Practices.

We commit to curation of best practices, connections between mathematical ideas, and communication to learn and share with a broad audience.

Goals:

At the end of the semester, teacher-learners should be able to say:

  • I can work within NCTM’s Eight Mathematical Teaching Practices for strengthening the teaching and learning of mathematics.
  • I can exercise mathematical flexibility to show what I know in more than one way.
  • I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them.

Facilitators:

Weekly schedule of topics:

Sep. 6 Subitizing and Number Talks:
 Elicit and use evidence of student thinking
Sep. 13 Numeracy and Visual Learning:
 Elicit and use evidence of student thinking
Sep. 20 Make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them:
 Facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse
Sep. 27 Attend to Precision and Construct a Viable Argument:
Facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse
Oct. 4 Strengthen Mathematical Flexibility:
Use and connect mathematical representations
Oct. 11 Visual Patterns – Strength Mathematical Flexibility:
Use and connect mathematical representations
Oct. 18 Mathematizing Children’s Literature (part 1):
Implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving
Oct. 25 Mathematizing Children’s Literature (part 2):
Implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving
Nov. 1 Designing Intentional Number Strings:
Building Procedural Fluency from Conceptual Understanding
Nov. 8 Using Appropriate Tools Strategically:
Building Procedural Fluency from Conceptual Understanding
Nov. 15 Empowering Learners:
Establish mathematical goals to focus learning
Nov. 22 Thanksgiving
Nov. 29 Deep Practice – challenged and learning
Support productive struggle in learning mathematics
Dec. 6 The Art of Questioning or Making Sense of Tasks part 2
Support productive struggle in learning mathematics
Dec. 13 14 Review and Reflection:
Pose purposeful questions

Anchor Resources:

Norms:


Leinwand, Steve. Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All. Reston, VA.: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2014. (p. 46) Print.

Smith, Margaret Schwan., et al. Taking Action: Implementing Effective Mathematics Teaching Practices in Grades K-. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2017.

Smith, Margaret Schwan., et al. Taking Action: Implementing Effective Mathematics Teaching Practices in Grades 6-8. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2017.

Stein, Mary Kay., and Margaret Smith. 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.

Summer PD: Day 2 Mathematical Flexibility

Summer Literacy and Mathematics Professional Learning
June 5-9, 2017
Day 2 – Mathematical Flexibility
Jill Gough and Becky Holden

Today’s focus and essential learning:

I can demonstrate mathematical flexibility to show what I know in more than one way.

(but , what if I can’t?)

Learning target and pathway:

Mathematics is a subject that allows for precise thinking, but when that precise thinking is combined with creativity, flexibility, and multiplicity of ideas, the mathematics comes alive for people (Boaler, 58 pag.)

…we know that what separates high achievers from low achievers is not that high achievers know more math, it is that they interact with numbers flexibly and low achievers don’t.  (Boaler, n. pag.)

UED: 8:45 – 11:15  / EED: 1:15 – 2:45

 Slide deck

Resources:

Summer PD: Literacy and Numeracy

As part of our practice, we offer in-house summer professional learning around literacy and numeracy.

There are two strands that both focus on the workshop model and conferring with students in literacy and in math.  Tiffany Coleman (@TColemanReads)and Lisa Eickholdt (@LisaEickholdt) will each join us on June 5th and 6th, respectively, to further our work in conferring.  On June 7th, Marsha Harris (@MarshaMac74) will round out the literacy work with a session on differentiation.  Jill Gough (@jgough) and Becky Holden (@bholden86) will facilitate three days of interactive math learning so that it parallels the work in literacy.
Here’s the big picture view of the professional learning days:
 Our essential learnings are based on ALT’s goal for all faculty-learners:

Fall PD Opportunity: Embolden Your Inner Mathematician #TrinityLearns

How do we effectively lead mathematics education in the era of the digital age?  We commit to curation of best practices, connections between mathematical ideas, and communication to learn and share with a broad audience.  

To build confidence as well as a more visual approach to elementary mathematics learning and teaching, we have designed ongoing, early morning, job-embedded professional learning around teaching practices and current research. 

Goals:

At the end of the semester, teacher-learners should be able to say:

  • I can exercise mathematical flexibility to show what I know in more than one way.
  • I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them.
  • I can work within NCTM’s Eight Mathematical Teaching Practices for strengthening the teaching and learning of mathematics.

Details:

Facilitators:

The weekly schedule of topics are as follows:


If you are  interested in emboldening your inner mathematician and would like to join us, please contact us for additional details.

Jill Gough | Director of Teaching & Learning
Experiments in Learning by Doing | Jill Gough notes
jgough@trinitatl.org | @jgough

Trinity School | www.trinityatl.org
4301 Northside Parkway | Atlanta, GA 30327
Phone 404.240.6220 | Fax 404.231.8111

Mathematizing Read-Alouds

Mathematizing Read-Alouds
KSU Conference on Literature for Children and Young Adults
March 21, 2017
Becky Holden, Trinity School
Megan Noe, Trinity School
Jill Gough, Trinity School

How might we deepen our understanding of numeracy using Children’s literature? What if we mathematize our read aloud books to use them in math as well as reading and writing workshop? We invite you to listen and learn while we share ways to deepen understanding of numeracy and literacy. Come exercise your mathematical flexibility to show what you know more than one way.

Books on which to practice: