Tag Archives: Julia Kuipers

#ObserveMe – the other side – invitation and purpose

Observation by invitation and with purpose.

For context, stop and read Robert Kaplinsky’s
(@robertkaplinsky) #ObserveMe challenge if you haven’t.

How might we serve one another? What if we have questions about our practice? In a community of confident, competent risk-takers, it is safe to declare what we’d like to learn, our goals, and hoped for feedback.

Today, I served as observer-learner for two such teacher-learners.

Julia Kuipers (@J_kuipers3) 6th Grade Spanish:

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Since Julia was seeking feedback on how much time they spoke in the target language, I tried to incorporate a timestamp in my sketch.

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I could share my sketch in real-time prior to leaving the classroom for immediate feedback.  Later in the day, I could reflect on Julia’s class and use my sketch, I could offer additional feedback in her feedback collection form.

Her feedback form:

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I liked that I could write about what I noticed and what I wonder.  I made sure that I commented on what I saw that could be used as evidence of time in the target language, students empowered to level up and stretch themselves, and students serving as resources for each other.  I wondered about extending formative assessment to include performance as well as efficacy.


Megan Hayes-Golding (@mgolding) Physics:

First, it is important to note that we are not at the same school, though this is still observation by invitation and with purpose.

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While my sketch chronicled my observation, I noticed and noted when Megan provided levels of challenge within an activity and when students were set up for success when working independently.

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Since it was at the end of the day, I had the opportunity to debrief and offer direct feedback in conversation with Megan.


I am thankful for the learning experiences today.  I am grateful for the invitations. I appreciate knowing what to observe so that I can learn and serve.

Observation by invitation and with purpose.

Everyone learns.

Wow!


Addendum: Megan’s reflection of this #ObserveMe experience

Feedback please – a focus on progress – an update

One additional revision of Julia’s rubric has been made based on feedback from our friend and colleague, Angél W. Kytle (@akytle).  In her comment, she asks

“… A couple of questions– first, do you need the number? Why have the kids rank themselves, especially if they are reflecting and also describing evidence of their assessment of themselves? …” (read all of the comments)

The numbers are actually quite important to me. They are not for quantitative purposes. They are communicating levels to move through. Our target is level 3, always. The numbers indicate what level you are on and offer one way (or two) to level up. Of course, once you’ve reached the target, we want you to stretch and level up if possible. I use the following visual when presenting and teaching about leveled assessments.

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While I must be frustrating her, Julia continues to think, learn, and prototype assessments.

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I love how Julia continues to act on and ask for feedback. Angél’s question help us move another step in the right direction.  We value and appreciate any feedback, warm or cool, that you might also offer.

Feedback please – a focus on progress

Building trust and relationship is critically important in growing and completing feedback loops.  I’ve been co-teaching World Language with Julia Kuipers as often as my schedule allows.  If you’ve read the posts, you know she is an excellent teacher.

Earlier this week, I read You’ve Been Doing a Fantastic Job. Just One Thing … from The New York Times. (HT @boadams1) The following passage stuck with me.

 “Those who had just started learning the language wanted the positive feedback, while those who had been taking the French classes longer were more interested in hearing about what they did wrong and how to correct it.

Why is that? One reason is that as people gain expertise, feedback serves a different purpose. When people are just beginning a venture, they may not have much confidence, and they need encouragement. But experts’ commitment ‘is more secure than novices and their focus is on their progress,’ the paper’s authors said.”

I loved receiving the following email from Julia.

Screen Shot 2013-04-12 at 8.20.39 PMJulia writes “I turned the student’s ideas into a self assessment for the 6th Grade ELD langauge project.” Awesome! Building a rubric from student ideas.  Here’s her draft:

I was off campus at a conference.  Here is my quick reply.

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I wondered what might come next.  How would Julia react to my feedback? What changes, if any, would she make?

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I really appreciate that she planned time in her schedule to review the feedback and work on another iteration.

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What a transformation! I bet that we are not finished with this rubric, but I think the next step is to use it with students.  They will have valuable feedback, and we want to continue to refine our assessments with their input.

To show Julia’s engagement in the process (and complete the communication trail), here is the rest of our exchange.

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To reiterate:

“… as people gain expertise, feedback serves a different purpose.”

Julia and I invite you to offer your ideas, opinions, and expertise to help us improve so that we may better serve our learners.  Any and all feedback is welcome.

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Tugend, Alina. “SHORTCUTS; How to Give Effective Feedback, Both Positive and Negative.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 06 Apr. 2013. Web. 12 Apr. 2013.