Tag Archives: progress reports

PD Lesson Planning: Progress Report Prototyping

It’s about focus.

Screen Shot 2013-09-19 at 4.37.20 AMWhen we report progress, formally, do we remember that this report is just one of many parts of a system? Do we focus our efforts on using a progress report to document learning and grow up to this point in time? Do we remember that there are many other parts of the system that give feedback, communicate progress, and communicate learning?

As a community, we have been discussing how we might adjust our methods of communicating learning through our formal progress reports.  You can see some of the steps on our journey by reading the following:

We met today to discuss our next steps in this journey.  Below is a copy of the lesson plan shared with faculty.

We will use a Google site and Google docs to collaboratively write the narrative comments that tell the story of our learners.

Will we embrace this adjustment in the way we report progress?  Will we be able to focus our energy to tell the story of learning? Will we grow in our understanding and use of growth mindset language? Do we see ourselves as young learners in this process? Will we prototype, pratice, and experiment? Will we seek feedback and share our thinking?

Screen Shot 2013-09-19 at 5.23.02 AM

#MICON13: Honoring our Learning Philosophy Through Learning Reports, Is It About Learning and Progress, or Grades

Do our report cards serve our learners? Do our reports of progress communicate in ways that leverage the current tools at our disposal? Do we report and celebrate with communication techniques that have design, images, and artifacts of learning? What if we model and practice communication with and for our learners the way the world currently communicates?

What small shift can we make in our current practices to model communication in 2013?

Reflect and dream big while also taking small, or not-so-small steps to plan on how to move a classroom or a school to dynamically describe, document, report, and celebrate learning. How might we honor and leverage current cultural buzzwords and Eduspeak – risk-taking, failure, personalizing learning, design-thinking, grit, and authentically make these concepts part of our learning report for each child?  At the end of this session, you should be able to say

        • I can think about and discuss how to report progress, learning, and growth in 2013.
        • I can facilitate a conversation at my school about our learning philosophy or our grading philosophy and what is important in our community.

Learning Progression (120 minutes):

15 mins
Quick write and share, see below
10 mins
Snapshots of other feedback options – don’t be constrained by our current norm
25 mins
Using the provided whiteboards, draw, write, design, etc. the ideal progress report considering the child at the center, families needing feedback, and   teacher workflow.
05 mins
Share with another group.  If you’d like to share your ideation digitally, take a photo of your work and email it to walked60son@photos.flickr.com
15 mins
Gallery Walk to view all ideas – feedback and questions (see below)
15 mins
Think, pair, share: In 2013, what should be included in a progress report?
10 mins
Progress Report Ideation – 3 distilled ideas
15 mins
Next steps…

Quick write and Share:

Individually respond to the following prompts – digital copy if you want to share

  • Bright spots from current practices in progress reporting:  What are some positives about our current progress reports?
  • Wish list for progress reporting:  What changes would make the progress report more personalized and put the child at the center?
  • Anything else?  Knowing that progress reports are an important connection between home and school, what would be in a progress report that is a joy to report (for teachers) and read (for families) rather than a stress?

Gallery Walk

Think, pair, share:

  • In 2013, what should be in the next iteration of our progress report?
    Note: Let’s talk about what we should do, not what we are doing. Let’s talk about what will best serve our children and their families, not what we like and don’t like.

PD Lesson Planning: Progress Report Ideation – Part 2

Last week I wrote PD Lesson Planning: Progress Report Ideation – Part 1 and PD Lesson Planning: Progress Report Ideation – Part 1 reflection to share my current thinking about lesson planning for PD sessions that mirror what we want for lesson planning for student learning as well as a reflection on the experience from my perspective.  Going in, I knew this was at least a 2-part session for our work.  Part 2’s lesson plan and my pre-thinking is shared below.

Progress Report – Faculty Ideation – Part II
February 6

VELD Meet in the Media Center near the circulation desk

12:30 – 12:35
Announcements
12:35 – 12:50
Gallery Walk to view all ideas – feedback and questions (see below)
12:55 – 1:10
Think, pair, share: In 2013, what should be included in a progress report?
1:10 – 1:25
Working with a partner: Draw, sketch, illustrate what the next iteration of
progress reports might look like at Trinity. Please sign both of your names on the back of the paper.  Give to Jill when finished.
1:25 – 1:30
Complete attendance and reflection document

ELD & ULD Meet in the Media Center near the circulation desk

3:30 – 3:35
Announcements
3:35 – 3:50
Gallery Walk to view all ideas – feedback and questions (see below)
3:55 – 4:10
Think, pair, share: In 2013, what should be included in a progress report?
4:10 – 4:25
Working with a partner: Draw, sketch, illustrate what the next iteration of progress reports might look like at Trinity. Please sign both of your names on the back of the paper.  Give to Jill when finished.
4:25 – 4:30
Complete attendance and reflection document


Gallery Walk 

Think, pair, share:

        • In 2013, what should be in the next iteration of our progress report?
        • Note: Let’s talk about what we should do, not what we are doing. Let’s talk about what will best serve our children and their families, not what we like and don’t like.

Work with a partner

        • Draw, sketch, illustrate what the next iteration of progress reports might look like at Trinity. Don’t be constrained by our current norm.
        • Please sign both of your names on the back of the paper, so that we can ask clarifying questions if needed.

Note: This is a continuation of the meeting last week

Look at a remix

      • Annie’s 1st Trimester 2012-13 Progress Report
      • Jill’s remix of Annie’s 1st Trimester 2012-13 Progress Report

I reviewed my original challenge, shown below, as I planned.

When designing professional develop learning experiences, are we as purposeful about the pedagogy and methodology as we are the content? Do we model with faculty what we want to see happening in our classrooms with children? Can we integrate technology? Can we model formative assessment practices? Can we design interactive learning experiences?

I, knowing that I’m wasting my time, downloaded every whiteboard photo from the  Flickr stream and inserted it into a Google doc hoping that some of the faculty will share their feedback digitally.

This time, I choose not publish the parameter for selecting your partner.  I intend to ask faculty to work with someone “not like them.” I do not want 2 science teachers or 2 first grade teachers as partners.  Once again, I reflected on collaboration by difference from Cathy Davidson’s book Now You See It.  Will faculty remember and consider how important collaboration by difference is in the learning process? We want diversity in the partners; we want collaboration by difference.

“Collaboration by difference respects and rewards different forms and levels of expertise, perspective, culture, age, ability, and insight, treating difference not as a deficit but as a point of distinction.”  (Davidson, 100 pag.)

Purposefully, we will use paper and pen for this ideation.  While we are still not making decisions, we want more permanence to the ideas.

So, in this one-hour faculty work session:

    • Faculty and I will access the Progress Report – Faculty Ideation – Part 2 Google doc for resources and the agenda.
    • We will use the white boards and the space in the Media Center for a Gallery Walk of ideas.
    • Faculty can use a Google doc to offer feedback on the ideas drawn on the shared white boards.
    • Faculty will work in pairs to draw, sketch, write, etc. on paper their ideas for a next step in our progress reporting.
    • Faculty will share the current version of their ideas by handing me these papers.  I will scan them to share them back to the faculty.
    • Faculty will offer feedback via Google form.

The plan calls for interactive learning for participants, some integration of technology, and a balance of technology and face-to-face engagement.  In my next post, I’ll share the outcomes from this hour of faculty learning.

Oh, and I have to remember to ask for feedback from both today’s session and last week’s session.  My hypothesis is that faculty thought of last week as Division Meetings rather than as Professional Development.  It was both.

_________________________

Davidson, Cathy N.  Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Viking, 2011. Print.

PD Lesson Planning: Progress Report Ideation – Part 1

When designing professional develop learning experiences, are we as purposeful about the pedagogy and methodology as we are the content? Do we model with faculty what we want to see happening in our classrooms with children? Can we integrate technology? Can we model formative assessment practices? Can we design interactive learning experiences?

On January 30, we were supposed to have division meetings concerning progress reports and how we report learning, progress, and growth of our young learners.  The weather (tornadoes in our area) caused us to postpone the meeting until Friday, February 1 – a scheduled teacher work day.  Positives for making this decision included taking care of our children and their families as  carpool ran in heavy rain and seizing the opportunity for all divisions to work together during the same time and in the same space.

The original lesson plan, shared to all participants on Monday via email, had to be modified as follows:

Friday, February 1 – Meet in the Media Center

10:00-10:15
Quick write and share, see below

10:15-10:20
Snapshots of other feedback options – don’t be constrained by our current norm

10:20-10:50
Transition to vertical teams.  Using the provided whiteboards draw, write, design, etc. the ideal progress report considering the child at the enter, families needed feedback, and teacher workflow.

10:50-10:55
Share with others.  If you’d like to share your ideation digitally, take a photo of your work and email it to walked60son@photos.flickr.com.

10:55-11:00
Complete attendance and feedback form.

Quick write and Share:
Individually respond to the following prompts – digital copy if you want to share

      • Bright spots from current practices in progress reporting:  What are some positives about our current progress reports?
      • Wish list for progress reporting:  What changes would make the progress report more personalized and put the child at the center?
      • Anything else?  Knowing that progress reports are an important connection between home and school, what would be in a progress report that is a joy to report (for teachers) and read (for families) rather than a stress?

Vertical Teams – (pick your team)

Teams of 6.  Please have at least one Specials Teacher in each team and strive to have multiple grade level representation in each team.

Note:  One member of each team should take responsibility for the team’s whiteboard. We will share our ideas next Wednesday.

Below is the slide deck for the quick write and snapshot of other feedback options.

Intentionally, samples of report cards are not included in the slide deck.  We should not be constrained by what we know and already do.  Can we brainstorm other ways to provide feedback about growth and learning?

Will having faculty work in vertical teams help or hinder the brainstorming process?  This past summer, as a faculty, we read Cathy Davidson’s book Now You See It.  Will faculty remember and consider how important collaboration by difference is in the learning process?

“Collaboration by difference respects and rewards different forms and levels of expertise, perspective, culture, age, ability, and insight, treating difference not as a deficit but as a point of distinction.”  (Davidson, 100 pag.)

Purposefully, whiteboards and dry erase markers serve as tools for this brainstorming session.  We are not making decisions; we are dreaming, doodling, and thinking. Would using whiteboards and dry erase markers promote non-traditional thinking?  I think of Seth Godin’s post, Fear of Bad Ideas, where he states:

The problem is that you can’t have good ideas unless you’re willing to generate a lot of bad ones.  (Godin, n. pag.)

I also think of Cathy Davidson’s point:

“It always seems more cumbersome in the short-run to seek out divergent and even quirky opinions, but it turns out to be efficient in the end and necessary for success if one seeks an outcome that is unexpected and sustainable.”  (Davidson, 100 pag.)

Can we have a “bad idea” festival? Because of the temporary nature of the tools, will we be more opening to sharing and dreaming? Will we share odd and quirky ideas in search of an outcome that is unexpected and sustainable?

The strength of using the whiteboards is also a “problem” to consider.  In this two-part series of meetings, will the ideas stay intact for a week – the time between the two meetings?  Can we use technology to preserve the ideas as a back-up?  I remembered how Bob Dillon (@ideaguy42) showed a use of Flickr.  Can we preserve the ideas by taking a photo and sending them to a common Flickr stream?

So, in this one-hour faculty work session:

    • Faculty and I will access the Progress Report – Faculty Ideation – January 30 Google doc for resources and the agenda.
    • I will use Keynote to prompt the quick write and share visuals of a few ways to report progress.
    • Faculty will write using their MacBook, iPad, PC Tablet, or paper.
    • Faculty will work in vertical teams to draw, sketch, write, etc. on whiteboards.
    • Faculty will share the current version of their ideas by emailing a photo to my Flickr account.
    • Faculty will offer feedback via Google form.

So, the plan calls for interactive learning for participants, integration of technology, and a balance of technology to face-to-face engagement.  Whew! Seems like a lot for an hour.

In my next post, I’ll share the outcomes from this hour of faculty learning.  As this is a two-part lesson, I plan to write and share the lesson plan and outcomes of part 2 soon.

_________________________

Davidson, Cathy N.  Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Viking, 2011. Print.

“Seth’s Blog.” Seth’s Blog. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2013.