Tag Archives: STEAM

Moving to productive struggle

From “Mrs. Maas, how do I do this?” to “I finished and helped a friend.

How might we engage more learners simultaneously, offer visible opportunities to show what they know, and personalize feedback, intervention, and enrichment?

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What if we offer learners pathways to guide progress, actions, and collaboration?  What if we encourage productive struggle by offering guidance about process, actions, and collaboration? What if we intervene with coaching?

In case you cannot read Becky‘s learning progression above, I’ve included an edited version of it here:

  • Level 4:
    I can complete my item, and I can help others with theirs, explaining the circuit.
  • Level 3:
    I can build a wired item for Mom with materials provided.
  • Level 2:
    I can plan a wired item (layout and switch) with help from classmates or Mrs. Maas.
  • Level 1:
    I can get ideas from others on a plan.

Becky guides learners to plan, collaborate, test their independence, and then, when possible, contribute to the success of others. And, through the process, learn about circuits too.

“Collaboration by difference respects and rewards different forms and levels of expertise, perspective, culture, age, ability, and insight, treating difference not as a deficit but as a point of distinction.”  (Davidson, 100 pag.)

When our learners do not know what to do, how do we respond? What actions can we take – will we take – to deepen learning, empower learners, and to make learning personal?


Davidson, Cathy N.  Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Viking, 2011. Print.

 

STEAM: What Can We Learn From Zombies?

What if we explore the interests of our learners even when we do not see relevance immediately?

What can we learn from Zombies?

If you're ready for a zombie apocalypse, then you're ready for any emergency. emergency.cdc.gov

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thinkering and applying – #MakerEd #LearnAndShare

On February 26, I participated in a workshop with Lindsey OwnVinnie VrotnyJaymes Dec, and Andrew Carle on Maker Education.  It was AWESOME! (You can read a summary of the details of the workshop on Lindsey’s blog post, #MakerEd at #NAISac14!) I applaud their plan, pedagogy, and execution. It was a real workshop with learner choice and learning by doing. Here’s a glimpse of the action:

Maker
Image by Lindsey Own; used with permission.

My favorite of the experiences was the sewing station.  Using a strip of felt, snaps, an led, a battery, and some conductive thread, I created a wearable circuit. Now, I have to confess that I have, in my past, co-taught calculus-based physics to seniors.  While I was the calculus person on the team, I did quite well with circuits. I could read most problems, draw the circuit (in parallel or in series) and answer the question posed by the book.  Sewing my bracelet at NAIS was the first time I ever created, touched, designed a circuit. Amazing and sad at the same time.  How much more would I have understood about physics if I’d had the sewing experience first?

I wanted to have two leds on my bracelet.  In conversation with my 9-year old, she asked if her bracelet could have her name as well light up.  Trying to apply her ideas into my learning, here’s the next iteration in my learning:

MakerMe

I used 18 ct Aida cross stitch fabric and DMC thread to produce my bracelet.  I tried to capture the process in pictures.

I am grateful to  Lindsey OwnVinnie VrotnyJaymes Dec, and Andrew Carle for the experience at NAIS.

How might we connect ideas with our learners? How might we ramp up design and hands-on experiences to make additional opportunities for curiosity, creativity, critical reasoning, communication, collaboration, and control?