Tag Archives: #T3Learns

#NCTMLive #T3Learns Webinar: Implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving, and Use and connect mathematical representations

On Wednesday, May 2, 2018, Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828) and I co-facilitated the second webinar in a four-part series on the Eight Mathematics Teaching Practices from NCTM’s Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All.

Implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving,
and Use and connect mathematical representations.

Effective teaching of mathematics facilitates discourse among learners to build shared understanding of mathematical ideas by analyzing and comparing approaches and arguments.

  • How might we implement and facilitate tasks that promote productive discussions to strengthen the teaching and learning of mathematics in all our teaching settings – teaching students and teaching teachers?
  • What types of tasks encourage mathematical flexibility to show what we know in more than one way?

Our slide deck:

Our agenda:

7:00 Jill/Jennifer’s Opening remarks

  • Share your name and grade level(s) or course(s).
  • Norm setting and Purpose
7:05 Number Talk: 81 x 25

  • Your natural way and Illustrate
  • Decompose into two or more addends (show it)
  • Show your work so a reader understands without asking questions
  • Share work via Twitter using #NCTMLive or bit.ly/nctmlive52
7:10 #LL2LU Use and connect mathematical representations

  • Self-assess where you are
  • Self-assessment effect size

Think back to a lesson you taught or observed in the past month. At what level did you or the teacher show evidence of using mathematical representations?

7:15 Task:  (x+1)^2 does/doesn’t equal x^2+1
7:25 Taking Action (DEI quote)
7:30 #LL2LU Implement Tasks That Promote Reasoning and Problem Solving
7:35 Graham Fletcher’s Open Middle Finding Equivalent Ratios
7:45 Illustrative Mathematics: Jim and Jesse’s Money
7:55 Close and preview next in the series

Some reflections from the chat window:

I learned to pay attention to multiple representations that my students will create when they are allowed the chance to think on their own.  I learned to ask myself how am I fostering this environment with my questioning.

I learned to pay attention to the diversity of representations that different students bring to the classroom and to wait to everyone have time to think

I learned to pay attention (more) to illustrating work instead of focusing so much on algebraic reasoning in my approach to teaching Algebra I. I learned to ask myself how could I model multiple representations to my students.

I learned to pay attention to multiple representations because students all think and see things differently.

I learned to make sure to give a pause for students to make the connections between different ways of representing a problem, rather than just accepting the first right answer and moving on.  

I learned to pay attention to the ways that I present information and concepts to children… I need to include more visual representations when I working with algebraic reasoning activities.

Cross posted on Easing the Hurry Syndrome

#T3IC: Using technology alongside #SlowMath to promote productive struggle

At the 2018 International T³ Conference in San Antonio, Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828) and I presented the following two hour power session.

Using technology alongside #SlowMath
to promote productive struggle

How might we shift classroom culture so that productive struggle is part of the norm? What if this same culture defines and embraces mistakes as opportunities to learn? One of the Mathematics Teaching Practices from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ (NCTM) “Principles to Actions” is to support productive struggle in learning mathematics. We want all learners to make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them. The tasks we select and facilitate must offer opportunities for each learner to develop connections and deepen their conceptual understanding.

Join us to learn more about #SlowMath opportunities that encourage students to persevere through challenging tasks instead of allowing their struggle become destructive. This session will address:

  • How might we provide #SlowMath opportunities for all students to notice and question?
  • How do activities that provide for visualization and conceptual development of mathematics help students think deeply about mathematical ideas and relationships?

Here’s the agenda:

8:30 Introductions
8:40 Intent and Purpose

  • Principles to Actions
  • #SlowMath
  • Norms (SMPs)
8:45 3-2-1 Bridge Visible Thinking Routine
8:50 Using Structure to Solve a Task – Circle-Square Task

9:55 3-2-1 Bridge Visible Thinking Routine

  • 2 questions around Productive Struggle (share one with partner and listen to one of partner)
10:00 Construct a Viable Argument to make your thinking visible:
Does (x+1)²=x²+1?

10:25 3-2-1 Bridge Visible Thinking Routine

  • In the chat, 1 analogy/metaphor/simile for Productive Struggle
10:30 Close

Here’s my sketch note of our plan:

Dave Johnston (@Johnston_MSMath) recorded his thinking and learning and shared it with us via Twitter.

And, a little more feedback from Twitter:

Cross posted on The Slow Math Movement

Read with Me? Book study: 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Conversations

What if we study and practice, together, to embed formative assessment into our daily practice and learning?

After the success of the slow-chat book study on Embedding Formative Assessment we plan to engage in another slow chat book study.

A few years ago, as we embraced focusing our classrooms on the Standards for Mathematical Practice, a number of our community began reading and using the book by Peg Smith and Mary Kay Stein, 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions.

This book has been transformational to many educators, and there is also a companion book focused on the science classroom, 5 Practices for Orchestrating Task-Based Discussions in Science, by Jennifer Cartier and Margaret S. Smith.

Both books are also available in pdf format and NCTM offers them together as a bundle.

Simultaneous Study
: As our community works with both math and science educators, we are going to try something unique in reading the books simultaneously and sharing ideas using the same hashtag.

We know that reading these books, with the emphasis on classroom practices, will be worth our time. In addition to encouraging those who have not read them, we expect that those who have read them previously will find it beneficial to re-read and share with educators around the world.

Slow Chat Book Study
: For those new to this idea of a “slow chat book study”, we will use Twitter to share our thoughts with each other, using the hashtag #T3Learns.

With a slow chat book study you are not required to be online at any set time. Instead, share and respond to others’ thoughts as you can. Great conversations will unfold – just at a slower pace.

When you have more to say than 140 characters, we encourage you to link to blog posts, pictures, or other documents. There is no need to sign up for the study – just use your Twitter account and the hashtag #T3Learns when you post your comments.

Don’t forget to search for others’ comments using the hashtag #T3Learns.

Book Study Schedule
: We have established the following schedule and daily prompts to help with sharing and discussion. This will allow us to wrap up in early June.

book-study-1

The content of the Math and Science versions line up fairly well, with the exception of the chapters being off by one.

We continue to used the following prompts to spur discussion.

Read with me? book study: Embedding Formative Assessment

What if we study and practice, together, to embed formative assessment into our daily practice and learning?

Jennifer Wilson (@jwilson828), Kim Thomas (@Kim_math) and I are hosting a virtual book club around Dylan Wiliam’s Embedding Formative Assessment: Practical Techniques for K-12 Classrooms in January and February.

I am intrigued and inspired by the chapter titles. I want to learn more about learning intentions and success criteria, eliciting evidence of learning, feedback that moves learners forward, students serving as resources for each other, and students as owners of their own learning.

If you don’t have the book yet, you can check it out by reading the first chapter from Learning Science’s website.

Here’s our reading plan:

image

We want you to join us! We commit to reading one chapter per week and sharing our thinking using #T3Learns. To add a little structure to our reflective practice, we are going to share using the following Visible Thinking Routines.  Of course, we will share other things too.

We choose this reading pace in order to prepare for Dylan Wiliam’s keynote and sessions at the 2016 International T3 Conference in Orlando. We want to be able to ask questions and make connections based on our actions, experiences, successes, and struggles.

Join us! Let’s experiment and learn by doing.

How might we impact learning if we work on intentionally embedding formative assessment into our daily practice and learning?


Cross posted on Easing the Hurry Syndrome.


Ritchhart, Ron, Mark Church, and Karin Morrison. Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2011. Print.

Wiliam, Dylan, and Siobhán Leahy. Embedding Formative Assessment: Practical Techniques for F-12 Classrooms. West Palm Beach, FL: Learning Sciences, 2015. Print.

 

Lesson and Assessment Design – #T3Learns

What are we intentional about in our planning, process, and implementation?

  • Are the learning targets clear and explicit?
  • What are important check points and questions to guide the community to know if learning is occurring?
  • Is there a plan for actions needed when we learn we must pivot?

On Saturday, a small cadre of T3 Instructors gathered to learn together, to explore learning progressions, and to dive deeper in understanding of the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

The pitch:

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Jennifer and I fleshed out the essential learning in more detail:

  • I can design lessons anchored in CCSS or NGSS.
    • I can design a lesson incorporating national standards, an interactive TI-Nspire document, a learning progression, and a formative assessment plan.
    • I can anticipate Standards for Mathematical Practice that learners will employ during this lesson.
  • I can design a learning progression for a skill, competency, or process.
    • I can use student-friendly language when writing “I can…” statements.
    • I can design a leveled assessment for students based on a learning progression.
  • I can collaborate with colleagues to design and refine lessons and assessments.
    • I can calibrate learning progressions with CCSS and/or NGSS.
    • I can calibrate learning progressions with colleagues by giving and receiving growth mindset oriented feedback, i.e. I can offer actionable feedback to colleagues using I like… I wonder… what if…
    • I can refine my learning progressions and assessments using feedback from colleagues.

The first morning session offered our friends and colleagues an opportunity to experience a low-floor-high-ceiling task from Jo Boaler combined with a SMP learning progression.  After the break, we transitioned to explore the Standards for Mathematical Practice in community. The afternoon session’s challenge was to redesign a lesson to incorporate the design components experienced in the morning session.

Don’t miss the tweets from this session.

Here are snippets of the feedback:

I came expecting…

  • To learn about good pedagogy and experience in real time examples of the same. To improve my own skills with lesson design and good pedagogy.
  • Actually, I came expecting a great workshop. I was not disappointed. I came expecting that there would be more focus using the TI-Nspire technology (directly). However, the structure and design was like none other…challenging at first…but then stimulating!
  • to learn how to be more deliberate in creating lessons. Both for the students I mentor and for T3 workshops.
  • I came expecting to deepen my knowledge of lesson design and assessment and to be challenged to incorporate more of this type of teaching into my classes.

I have gotten…

  • so much more than I anticipated. I learned how to begin writing clear “I can” statements. I also have been enriched by those around me. Picking the brains of others has always been a win!
  • More than I bargained. The PD was more of an institute. It seemed to have break-out sessions where I could learn through collaboration, participation, and then challenging direct instruction, … and more!
  • a clear mind map of the process involved in designing lessons. A clarification of what learning progressions are. Modeling skills for when I present trainings. Strengthening my understanding of the 8 math practices.
  • a better idea of a learning progression within a single goal. I think I had not really thought about progressions within a single lesson before. Thanks for opening my eyes to applying it to individual lesson goals.

I still need (or want)…

  • To keep practicing to gain a higher level of expertise and comfort with good lesson design. Seeing how seamlessly these high quality practices can be integrated into lessons inspires me to delve into the resources provided and learn more about them. I appreciate the opportunity to stay connected as I continue to learn.
  • days like this where I can collaborate and get feedback on activities that will improve my teaching and delivery of professional development
  • I want to get better at writing the “I can” statements that are specific to a lesson.
  • I want to keep learning about the use of the five practices and formative assessment.

We want to see more collaborative productive struggle, pathways for success, opportunities for self- and formative assessment, productive conversation to learn, and more.

As Jennifer always says … and so the journey continues…

[Cross-posted at Easing the Hurry Syndrome]

 

Goals and Self-Assessment – Reflecting on My Learning as of February 9, 2014

I submitted a goal on April 8 which I updated on September 3October 3, and November 10, 2013.   Have I made progress on my goal through the action steps?  What will I learn if I review my intentions and collect evidence that supports my goal? If I take the time to check in and self-assess, will I be able to determine if I’m on a good path?

My Goal:

To purposefully act to forward Trinity School’s mission, faculty-learners and student-learners will grow significantly in their use of reflection and the formative, diagnostic, and self-assessment knowledge that come from such an approach to learning.

Action Steps:

  • Intentionally reflect and question to grow and learn. Publicly publish my reflections at Experiments in Learning by Doing. Connect with others by broadcasting each post via Twitter.
  • Reflect on learning by keeping a running record in an e-portfolio. Encourage and provide opportunities and support for others to develop professional portfolios that document learning, growth and reflections.
  • Support reflection, questioning, and growth of learners by designing and engaging in professional development opportunities for teacher-learners to learn by doing. Examples:
    • MyLearningEDU 1.5  for teacher-learners to model and experience My Learning from the student perspective.
    • Twitter for Learning  for teacher-learners to foster and develop connections with other educators and experts.
    • Leading Learners to Level Up  for teacher-learner teams to design and implement formative assessment that diagnoses and differentiates while leading learning.
    • (Added in November) Observation of Practice takes on the task of seeking and gaining perspective.  How might we help teachers focus on what is happening in classrooms in a systematic, purposeful and focused way? How might we model and embrace formative assessment of our practice? How might we leverage peer-to-peer assessment and feedback?

Shelley Paul (@lottascales) and I have facilitated two more rounds of Leading Learners to Level Up (#LL2LU) for The English Connection at Woodward and for Kindergarten-9th grade math teachers at Trinity, Walker, Woodward, Westminster, and Mount Vernon.  We also hosted a conversation at EduCon on writing learning progressions.  Our EduCon session was in collaboration with the Martin Institute and was broadcast to seven cities in the US with a total of approximately 140 participants.

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Broadcasting to multiple sites was a great learning experience.  Our site facilitators offered feedback on several areas.

Jill’s session was excellent. I’ve had great feedback from Renbrook teachers, especially US teachers from 3 different departments-English, World Language, and Science, who said they can see immediate application of the concept. They felt the presentation was a good blend of instruction and opportunity for collaborative practice. They plan on sharing this concept at department meetings this week. The Lower School teachers who attended will present the concept at a meeting in the near future.

_______________

Although we got behind schedule given the tech issues, the most informative moment was when our group was working on the creation of examples of LL2LU.  Although we thought the task would be simple as we set out to do our work, it actually was more difficult than we imagined.  Hence, the “I like,”  “I wonder,” and “What if” was very effective.  We weren’t able to post many examples given we were behind schedule, but viewing the myriad of postings on Flickr was equally exciting.  The group continually shared various findings as they were clicking around the sites.  Additionally, we collectively appreciated the “I can” and scaffolded approach to reaching a learning goal.  Much to think about here ….

_______________

Overall we got good feedback from this session.  We lost the feed a few times and it was hard to know exactly what was happening at times, but all of the preplanning that Jill and Shelley had done paid off – the lesson plan, agenda, etc helped keep us on track and we were able to continue the conversation even when we lost the feed.

There is a new team at Trinity piloting Observation of Practice this month, and I’ve shared the learning plan with interested teams at Westminster and Woodward.

Twitter for Learning had a plus this month too.  Karen Boykins (@K_Boykins) has requested the next course in the Twitter for Learning series.  Karen and Samantha Steinberg (@spsteinberg) collaborated with me to develop a list of essential outcomes for the second course in this series. How exciting to have learners ask for new learning experiences and challenges!

I like what I’ve done so far.  I continue to see products of my action steps in our Faculty’s #TrinityLearns tweets and with #LL2LU participants. I love this tweet from Kato – a nice mashup of assessment, feedback, and assessment.

feedback_tweet_kato

I wish I could interest and inspire more faculty to participate in MyLearningEDU 1.5. I wonder if I should design MyLearningEDU1.0 as a simpler first step.

My to-do list now includes developing and securing PLU credit for Connections and Furthering PLNs in the Twitter for Learning series and developing MyLearningEDU1.0.

Have I made small course corrections when needed?  What additional action steps need to be added?

_________________________

To see the development of this goal, see iterations

Goals and Self-Assessment – Reflecting on My Learning as of November 10, 2013

I submitted a goal on April 8 which I updated on September 3, 2013 and reviewed on October 3, 2013. Another month has gone by. Have I made progress on my goal through the action steps?  If I take the time to check in and self-assess, will I be able to determine if I’m on a good path? Will I be able to make a small course correction if I’ve gotten distracted along the way because of the busyness of school? What if I review my intentions and collect evidence now that supports my goal? What if I hold myself accountable for making small progress in just one month?

My Goal:

To purposefully act to forward Trinity School’s mission, faculty-learners and student-learners will grow significantly in their use of reflection and the formative, diagnostic, and self-assessment knowledge that come from such an approach to learning.

Action Steps:

  • Intentionally reflect and question to grow and learn. Publicly publish my reflections at Experiments in Learning by Doing using the tag #MyLearningEdu. Connect with others by broadcasting each post via Twitter.
  • Reflect on learning by keeping a running record in an e-portfolio. Encourage and provide opportunities and support for others to develop professional portfolios that document learning, growth and reflections.
  • Support reflection, questioning, and growth of learners by designing and engaging in professional development opportunities for teacher-learners to learn by doing. Examples:
    • MyLearningEDU 1.5  for teacher-learners to model and experience My Learning from the student perspective.
    • Twitter for Learning  for teacher-learners to foster and develop connections with other educators and experts.
    • Leading Learners to Level Up  for teacher-learner teams to design and implement formative assessment that diagnoses and differentiates while leading learning.

I continue to blog at least once a week. I’ve decided not to use #MyLearningEdu as a category or tag.  It doesn’t seem to make sense to me right now to use this tag.  I still owe Maggie Berthiaume a couple of comments and tweets.

Shelley Paul (@lottascales) and I have facilitated a complete 1-PLU course round of Leading Learners to Level Up (#LL2LU) for The English Connection at Woodward and for math teachers at Trinity and Mount Vernon.  We are planning another round of each during the winter.  I offered a Leading Learners to Level Up session on learning progressions at Trinity’s October 30 Faculty/Staff Forum.

I like what I’ve done so far.  I’ve seen products of my action steps in our Faculty’s #TrinityLearns tweets, Kathy and Maggie’s reflections on their blogs, and with the #LL2LU participants.

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See PD in Action for more stories of application of learning progressions and formative assessment.

I’ve also written a new 1-PLU course, Observation of Practice, for our teachers based on the comments of Arleen and Laura after reading my reflection of the class we taught together.  They both commented on how helpful it was to see their class from another perspective. Observation of Practice will integrate formative assessment and reflection with peer observation by having each team member reflect.

    • As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, which aspects of my teaching do I feel are bright spots?
    • As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, what questions do I have about my own teaching?
    • As a result of this observation of practice and feedback loop, what new ideas do I have?

I have to say that I find it helpful and motivating to check on my progress each month.  Am I intentionally working on my goal? Am I making progress? Have I made small course corrections to get back on track when I find myself distracted by other important work?

I’d love your feedback on any part of this process. Your questions and comments will help me learn and grow.

_________________________

To see the development of this goal, see iterations