Job-embedded PD: Observation of Practice – Focus on Learning

What if we add additional feedback loops in our culture?

How and when do adults in our schools receive formative feedback? If I have a question about my practice, how do I and from whom do I seek feedback?

If, as a school, we are studying formative assessment, self-assessment, and peer assessment, how are we practicing? Do I blog, journal, or keep a portfolio of my learning?  What might I want to learn? Are my students learning?

What if we focus on what is happening in classrooms in purposeful and focused ways? What if we model and embrace formative assessment of our practice?

What if we lend another our perspective?

We are going to pilot Observation of Practice this week in 4th Grade.  After reading my reflection of the class we taught together, Arleen and Laura both commented on how helpful it was to see their class from another perspective. We want to know if Observation of Practice will integrate formative assessment and reflection with peer observation.

What if we shift the focus of peer observations from observing our peers to observing the products of their work – the actions of students?

3 thoughts on “Job-embedded PD: Observation of Practice – Focus on Learning”

  1. This is an exciting exercise for all of you, Jill, something that educators should do more often and more systemically. As you work on this together with colleagues, it would be interesting to then have a discussion about how might this process/practice be formalized throughout the school– breaking down barriers of isolationism, time, schedules, and fear will all be part of the process but one very worthy of doing!

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  2. Thank you, Angél. I appreciate the encouragement and your thinking. If we are to understand and embrace formative feedback loops for our young learners, we must experience and experiment with them for ourselves. I am hoping to minimize fear and isolationism by shifting the focus from observation of the teacher to observation of the learning taking place in the classroom.

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