Boost Conceptual Understanding & Procedural Fluency with Rich Number Sense Tasks with @mr_stadel #MtHolyokeMath

I’m taking X.MTHED-404: Effective Practices for Advancing the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics (K-12).

Here are my notes from Session 4, Boost Conceptual Understanding & Procedural Fluency with Rich Number Sense Tasks, with Andrew Stadel.

Notes from previous sessions:

Goal work: learn more math, study the Practices

The math committee met this week to work on our goals. We agreed that, for the rest of this school year, we would spend half of our time on learning more math and the other half studying to learn more about the Standards For Mathematical Practice.

We met this week to learn more math and to discuss Chapter 1, Mathematical 1: Make Sense of Problems and Persevere in Solving Them in Beyond Answers: Exploring Mathematical Practices with Young Children by Mike Flynn.

Yearlong Goals:

  • We can learn more math.
  • We can share work with grade level teams to grow our whole community as teachers of math.
  • We can deepen our understanding of the Standards For Mathematical Practice.

Today’s Goals:

  • I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them.
  • I can reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • I can look for and make use of structure.

Resources:

Learning Plan

3:05 5 min Quick scan of Jo’s YouCubed article (pp. 2, 11)
3:05 20 min Solving equations visually to make sense of the algebra
(Learn more math)

productive-struggle-4 productive-struggle-3

3:25 5 min Book Club warm-up

3:30 20 min Use Visible Thinking Routines to guide discussion of Chapter One: Make Sense and Persevere
(deepen our understanding of the SMPs.)

3:55 5 min Feedback – “I learned…, “I liked…,”I felt…

Read Chapter 2: Reason Abstractly and Quantitatively

Update on PD (Goal: Scale our work to our teams.)

When we set purposeful team goals, we help each other make progress, and we use our time intentionally.


Flynn, Michael. Beyond Answers: Exploring Mathematical Practices with Young Children. Portland, Maine.: Stenhouse, 2017. Print.

Van de Walle, John. Teaching Student-centered Mathematics: Developmentally Appropriate Instruction for Grades Pre-K-2. Boston: Pearson, 2014. Print.

Leave No Question Unasked: Maximizing Demand & Engagement in Math Tasks with @ddmeyer #MtHolyokeMath

I’m taking X.MTHED-404: Effective Practices for Advancing the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics (K-12).

Here are my notes from Session 3, Leave No Question Unasked: Maximizing Demand & Engagement in Math Tasks, with Dan Meyer.


Notes from previous sessions:

PD planning: #Mathematizing Read Alouds

How might we deepen our understanding of numeracy using children’s literature? What if we mathematize our read aloud books to use them in math as well as reading and writing workshop?

Have you read Love Monster and the last Chocolate from Rachel Bright?

Becky Holden and I planned the following professional learning session to build common understanding and language as we expand our knowledge of teaching numeracy through literature.  Each Early Learners, Pre-K, and Kindergarten math teacher participated in 2.5-hours of professional learning over the course of the day.

screen-shot-2017-02-10-at-5-12-49-pm

To set the purpose and intentions for our work together we shared the following:

screen-shot-2017-01-15-at-8-35-21-am screen-shot-2017-01-15-at-8-35-31-am

Becky’s lesson plan for Love Monster and the last Chocolate is shown below:

lovemonsterlessonplan

After reading the story, we asked teacher-learners what they wondered and what they wanted to know more about.  After settling on a wondering, we asked our teacher-learners to use pages from the book to anticipate how their young learners might answer their questions.

After participating in a gallery walk to see each other’s methods, strategies, and representations, we summarized the ways children might tackle this task. We decided we were looking for

  • counts each one
  • counts to tell how many
  • counts out a particular quantity
  • keeps track of an unorganized pile
  • one-to-one correspondence
  • subitizing
  • comparing

When we are intentional about anticipating how learners may answer, we are more prepared to ask advancing and assessing questions as well as pushing and probing questions to deepen a child’s understanding.

If a ship without a rudder is, by definition, rudderless, then formative assessment without a learning progression often becomes plan-less. (Popham,  Kindle Locations 355-356)

Here’s the Kindergarten learning progression for I can compare groups to 10.

Level 4:
I can compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

Level 3:
I can identify whether the number of objects (1-10) in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group by using matching and counting strategies.

Level 2:
I can use matching strategies to make an equivalent set.

Level 1:
I can visually compare and use the use the comparing words greater than/less than, more than/fewer than, or equal to (or the same as).

Here’s the Pre-K  learning progression for I can keep track of an unorganized pile.

Level 4:
I can keep track of more than 12 objects.

Level 3:
I can easily keep track of objects I’m counting up to 12.

Level 2:
I can easily keep track of objects I’m counting up to 8.

Level 1:
I can begin to keep track of objects in a pile but may need to recount.

How might we team to increase our own understanding, flexibility, visualization, and assessment skills?

Teachers were then asked to move into vertical teams to mathematize one of the following books by reading, wondering, planning, anticipating, and connecting to their learning progressions and trajectories.

During the final part of our time together, they returned to their base-classroom teams to share their books and plans.

After the session, I received this note:

Hi Jill – I /we really loved today. Would you want to come and read the Chocolate Monster book to our kids and then we could all do the math activities we did as teachers? We have math most days at 11:00, but we could really do it when you have time. We usually read the actual book, but I loved today having the book read from the Kindle (and you had awesome expression!).

Thanks again for today – LOVED it.

How might we continue to plan PD that is purposeful, actionable, and implementable?


Cross posted on Connecting Understanding.


Hattie, John A. (Allan); Fisher, Douglas B.; Frey, Nancy; Gojak, Linda M.; Moore, Sara Delano; Mellman, William L. (2016-09-16). Visible Learning for Mathematics, Grades K-12: What Works Best to Optimize Student Learning (Corwin Mathematics Series). SAGE Publications. Kindle Edition.

Norris, Kit; Schuhl, Sarah (2016-02-16). Engage in the Mathematical Practices: Strategies to Build Numeracy and Literacy With K-5 Learners (Kindle Locations 4113-4115). Solution Tree Press. Kindle Edition.

Popham, W. James. Transformative Assessment in Action: An Inside Look at Applying the Process (Kindle Locations 355-356). Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Kindle Edition.

Learner choice: using appropriate tools strategically takes time and tools

All students benefit from using tools and learning how to use them for a variety of purposes.  If we don’t make tools readily available and value their use, our students miss out on major learning opportunities. (Flynn, 106 pag.)

I’m taking the #MtHolyokeMath #MTBoS course, Effective Practices for Advancing the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics.  Zachary Champagne facilitated the second session and used The Cycling Shop task from Mike Flynn‘s TMC article.

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-2-50-42-pm

You can see the notes I started on paper.

mtholyokemath-2-zakchamp

Jim, Casey and I used a pre-made Google slide deck provided to us to collaborate since we were located in GA, MA, and CA.  We challenged ourselves to consider wheels after working with 8 wheels.

Here’s what our first table looked like.

cyclingshop1

Now, I was having trouble keeping up with the number of wheels and the number of cycles.  So I did this:

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-3-08-56-pm

This made it both better and worse for me (and for my group).

Here’s an interesting thing.  I’ve been studying, practicing, and teaching the Standards for Mathematical Practices. Jennifer Wilson and I have written a learning progression to help learners learn to say I can use appropriate tools strategically.

Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. (Sage, 6 pag.)

Clearly, I was not even at Level 1 during class.  Not once – not once – during class did it occur to me how much a spreadsheet would help me, strategically.

8wheelsspreadsheet

The spreadsheet would calculate the number of wheels automatically for each row so that I could confirm correct combinations.  (You can view this spreadsheet and make a copy to play with if you are interested.)

When making mathematical models, [mathematically proficient students] know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. (Sage, 6 pag.)

With a quick copy and paste, I could tackle any number of wheels using my spreadsheet.  I can look for and make use of structure emerged quickly when using the spreadsheet strategically.  (I want to also highlight color as a strategic tool.) Play with it; you’ll see.

9_wheelsspreadsheet

[Mathematically proficient students] are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts. (Sage, 6 pag.)

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-4-03-03-pm

There is no possible way I would have the stamina to seek all the combinations for 25 or 35 wheels by hand, right?

Students have access to a wide assortment of tools that they must learn to use for their mathematical work. The sheer volume of possibilities can seem overwhelming, but with time and experience, students can learn how to choose the right tool for the task at hand and how to use it strategically to reach their goal. (Flynn, 106 pag.)

Important to repeat, “with time and experience, students can learn how to choose the right tool for the task at hand and how to use it strategically to reach their goal.

For this to happen, we need to have a solid understanding of the kinds of tools available, the purpose of each tool, and how students can learn to use them flexibly and strategically in any given situation. This also means that we have to make these tools readily available to students, encourage their use, and provide them with options so they can decide which tool to use and how to use it. If we make all the decisions for them, we remove that critical component of MP5 where students make decisions based on their knowledge and understanding of the tools and the task at hand. (Flynn, 106 pag.)

To be clear, a spreadsheet was available to me during class, but I didn’t see it.  How might we make tools readily available and visible for learners to choose?

When we commit to empower students to deepen their understanding, we make tools available and encourage exploration and use, so that each learner makes decisions for themselves. In other words, how do we help learners to level up in both content and practice?

What if we make I can look for and make use of structure; I can use appropriate tools strategically; and I can make sense of tasks and persevere in solving them essential to learn for every learner?

How might we offer tools and time?

It’s about learning by doing, right?


Flynn, Michael. Beyond Answers: Exploring Mathematical Practices with Young Children. Portland, Maine.: Stenhouse, 2017. Print.

Flynn, Mike. “The Cycling Shop.” Nctm.org. Teaching Children Mathematics, Aug. 2016. Web. 03 Feb. 2017.

Common Core State Standards.” The SAGE Encyclopedia of Contemporary Early Childhood Education (n.d.): n. pag. Web.