Tag Archives: feedback loops

Listening, trust, and feedback – A More Beautiful Question VTR SPW

Bennett says that within IDEO, the company recognizes it’s important to create an environment where it’s safe to ask “stupid” questions. (Berger, 80 pag.)

It’s about culture and atmosphere and bravery. Are we striving for progress or perfection?

As the writer Peter Sims noted in Harvard Business Review, most of us, throughout our school years and even in the business world, have been taught to hold back ideas until they are polished and perfect. (Berger 120 pag.)

What if we embrace risk-taking to show our work and thinking early and often? Are we taking actions to teach and model constructive critique for learning?

In committing to an idea, it becomes critical to find a way to share it in order to get feedback. (Berger, 118 pag.)

If we show work in progress, are we fearful that the feedback will cause a shutdown rather than a new iteration?

Which brings us back to culture and climate.

AMBQ-Chpt3

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
A More Beautiful Question
Chapter 3: The Why, What if, and How of Innovative Questioning

How are we listening to learners – every learner? What if we use technology to offer everyone a voice and an opportunity to question, to see the thinking of others, and to offer feedback to themselves and others?

Are we listening deeply to each other? Are we observing – paying attention – closely to learn?

Why are we afraid to show our work? What if feedback is asked for as well as given? How might we shift our culture?


Note:

Chapter 3 is also full of interesting, important questions and ideas to ponder. These ideas and questions connect, for me, to assessment, design thinking, and makery.

I have many notes in my book. I am part of a cohort reading this book. I know that others will highlight and help discuss additional ideas from this chapter.


Berger, Warren (2014-03-04). A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas . BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING. Kindle Edition.

Be curious; overcome fear; ask – A More Beautiful Question VTR SPW

[learners] may be self-censoring their questions due to cultural pressures. (Berger, 58 pag.)

What are the cultural norms  in our learning community around asking questions? Who has permission to ask questions?

But this issue of “Who gets to ask the questions in class?” touches on purpose, power, control, and, arguably, even race and social class. (Berger, 56 pag.)

If learners are self-censoring their questions because of cultural pressures, who really has permission to ask questions?

How might we create space and opportunity for additional voices to contribute questions? What if we leverage tools – technology, protocols, strategies – to offer every learner new ways to have a voice?

What would it look and sound like in the average classroom if we wanted to make “being wrong” less threatening? (Berger, 50 pag.)

What is to be gained from using  feedback loops as a way to make the possibility of “being wrong” less threatening?

Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 12.55.21 PM

Image from Kato Nim's 4th Grade Class

How might we show that what we don’t know gives direction for learning and growth?

AMBQ-Chpt2

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
A More Beautiful Question
Chapter 2: Why We Stop Questioning?

If learners are self-censoring their questions because of cultural pressures, what actions should/can/will be taken?


Note:

Chapter 2 is full of interesting, important questions and ideas to ponder.

Why do kids ask so many questions? (And how do we really feel about that?) Why does questioning fall off a cliff? Can a school be built on questions? Who is entitled to ask questions in class? If we’re born to inquire, then why must it be taught? (Berger, 39 pag.)

I have many notes in my book. I am part of a cohort reading this book. I know that others will highlight and help discuss additional ideas from this chapter.


Berger, Warren (2014-03-04). A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas . BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING. Kindle Edition.

Assessment PD: #LL2LU Learning Progressions – a.k.a. Falconry – feedback

Yesterday’s session on assessment causes me to wonder…Are we afraid of cool feedback? I wonder if we so closely connect feedback to being evaluated that we miss opportunities to learn and grow.  What if we embed feedback loops in our routine? What if we make feedback a habit? Are we in such a hurry to “get ‘it’ done” that we miss opportunities to make “it” better?

What if we use peer feedback to improve our work and gain new perspectives?

I liked working in a small group and getting feedback from all other groups.

[I liked] More practice building levels and considering exactly what I want for our students to be able to do. Also, the collaboration was helpful–this time. I enjoyed working solo at first–I felt more comfortable thinking together with a colleague this time.

I like the challenge.  It’s difficult to look at your progression and try to make it make sense to your team and students.  The feedback opened our eyes to some, now obvious, flaws in our levels.

We can take the feedback that we received and use it to better our lessons and ways to level the lessons to benefit the variety of learners in the classroom.

If we find peer feedback useful and constructive, will we offer the same opportunities to our young learners by intentionally incorporating feedback loops into our lesson plans?

What if we indicate the target level of learning? (Can we?) How might we shift the language and learning in our classrooms?

This session really got us thinking about considering different perspectives when determining our students’ skill expectations.  It made us think about how to make assessment clear to learners and to those who will interpret the assessment information.

I loved breaking down the goals we have for our children into levels.  It makes it clearer to me how I can teach students of various knowledge levels.

When doing the exercise today, I realized I need to slow down and put myself in a Pre-Kers perspective and not an adult or parents perspective.

It was interesting to find out how others see our assessment levels, and it gave me incentive to speed up or slow down expectations for students at my grade level.

Students all have different ability levels and only rarely will you find a whole group at the same “level.”  We also need to help kids realize what they do know and where they need help.

I think that it was important to see the progression of learning and expectations written down on paper. Actually thinking about where we want our kids to be, how they’re going to get there, and what comes next is so helpful.

Through experiential learning, are we finding connections?

It was helpful in thinking about we plan our lessons and units and leveling up.  It was also helpful practice in writing I can statements…

Especially following conferences and progress reports, we are very aware of the necessity of clear expectations and plans of actions for parents and students.

[This] helps us collaborate on ways to differentiate the instruction.

I liked learning about leveling up and it helps me understand how to calibrate horizontally.

This session really got us thinking about considering different perspectives when determining our students’ skill expectations.  It made us think about how to make assessment clear to learners and to those who will interpret the assessment information.

How might we continue to find connections and experience growth-oriented feedback? What if we intentionally experiment with these ideas in our classrooms with learners?

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