Tag Archives: @katonims129

#KSULit2018: Mathematizing Read Alouds

At the 27th Annual KSU Conference on Literature for Children and Young Adults where the theme was Reimagining the Role of Children’s and Young Adult Literature, I presented the following 50-minute session on Tuesday, March 20, 2018.

Mathematizing Read Alouds

How might we deepen our understanding of numeracy using children’s literature? What if we mathematize our read-aloud books to use them in math as well as literacy? We invite you to notice and note, listen and learn, and learn by doing while we share ways to deepen understanding of numeracy and literacy.

Let’s debunk the myth that mathematicians do all work in their heads.  Mathematicians notice, wonder, note, identify patterns, ask questions, revise thinking, and share ideas.  Mathematicians show their thinking with details so that a reader understands without having to ask questions.

What if we pause during read-alouds to give learners a chance to analyze text features, to notice and wonder, to ask and answer questions in context?

How might we inspire and teach learners to make their thinking visible so that a reader understands?

Here’s my sketch note of the plan:

Here are more of the picture books highlighted in this session:

And, a list by approximate grade levels:

Early Learners, Pre-K, and Kindergarten

Kindergarten and 1st Grade

2nd, 3rd, 4th Grade

4th, 5th, 6th Grade

#ShowYourWork: words, pictures, numbers

In her Colorful Learning post, Learning: Do our students know we care about that?, Kato shared the following learning progression for showing your work.

What if we guide our learners to

I can describe or illustrate ow I arrived at a solution so that the reader understands without talking to me?

Isn’t this really about making thinking visible and clear communication?  Anyone who has taught learners who take an AP exam can attest to the importance of organized, clear pathways of thinking. It is not about watching the teacher show work, it is about practicing, getting feedback, and revising.

Compare the following:

What if a learner submits the following work?

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Can the reader understand how the writer arrived at this solution without asking any questions?

What if the learner shared more thinking? Would it be clearer to the reader? What do you think?

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How often do we tell learners that they need to show their work? What if they need to show more work? What if they don’t know how?

How might we communicate and collaborate creatively to show and tell how to level up in showing work and making thinking visible?

How might we grow in the areas of comprehension, accuracy, flexibility, and deeper understanding if we learn to communicate clearly using words, pictures, and numbers?

#LL2LU Show your work – grade 4

How might we foster a community of learners where everyone bravely and fiercely seeks feedback?

I was at EduCon in Philadelphia when this tweet arrived last week.

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Am I showing enough work? How do I know? What if we partner, students and teachers, to seek feedback, clarity, and guidance?Screen Shot 2015-01-30 at 3.45.26 PM

Success inspires success.

Yesterday, I dropped by Kato‘s classroom to work on the next math assessment and found our learners working together to apply math and to improve communication.

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Now, I was just sneaking in to drop off and pick up papers.  But, how could I turn down requests for feedback?

Here’s the #showyourwork #LL2LU progression in the classroom:

Grade 4

Level 4
I can show more than one way to find a solution to the problem.

Level 3
I can describe or illustrate how I arrived at a solution in a way that the reader understands without talking to me.

Level 2
I can find a correct solution to the problem.

Level 1
I can ask questions to help me work toward a solution to the problem.

And here’s one child and her work. “Ms. Gough, will you look at my work? Can you understand it without asking me questions? Is is clear to you?”

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I see connected words, pictures, and numbers. I like the color coding for the different size bags.  I appreciate reading the sentences that explain the numbers and her thinking.  I also witnessed this young learner improve her work and her thinking while watching me read her work.  She knew what she wanted to add, because she wished I knew why she made the final choice.  I’d call this Level 4 work.

What if we foster a community of learners who bravely and fiercely seek feedback?

Connect disconnected pathways with multiple representations

A doodler is connecting neurological pathways with perviously disconnected pathways.  A doodler is concentrating intently, sifting through information, conscious and otherwise, and – much more often than we realize – generating massive insights.  (Brown, 11 pag.)

How might we test this? What if we engage with our curriculum to experience connecting disconnected pathways, to generate insights, to make thinking visible?

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It is the relationship between the teacher, the student, and the content – not the qualities of any one of them by themselves – that determines the nature of instructional practice, and each corner of the instructional core has its own particular role and resources to bring to the instructional process. (City and Elmore, 22 pag.)

What if we make a small shift in our role and resources to bring multiple representations to our practice?

Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 7.11.21 PM …, it is the change in the knowledge and skill that the teachers bring to the practice, the type of content to which students gain access, and the role that students play in their own learning that determine what students will know and be able to do. (City and Elmore, 24 pag.)

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These learners need doodling in order to focus more acutely on what’s being said, and they demonstrate better recall when they’re allowed to doodle than when they’re not.  (Brown, 21 pag.)

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Just make a mark and see where it takes you. (Reynolds, n. pag.)


Brown, Sunni. The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently. New York: Portfolio/Penguin, 2014. Print.

City, Elizabeth A. Instructional Rounds in Education: A Network Approach to Improving Teaching and Learning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education, 2009. Print.

Reynolds, Peter. The Dot. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick, 2003. Print.

Math, Mindset, and Learning Progressions – #LL2LU w/@katonims129

One of the hallmarks of learning at Trinity School is Faculty/Staff Forum, our peer-to-peer professional development. Today, Kato Nims and I facilitated as session on math, mindset, and learning progressions.

The pitch:

Title: Math, Mindset, & Learning Progressions

Facilitators: Kato Nims and Jill Gough

Description: Does a learning progression empower and embolden the learn to locate where they are and ask target questions to make progress: Come collaborate with others to tackle a task or two using a learning progression as a self- and formative assessment tool to experience a student’s point of view.

Prerequisites: None. Bring a pencil or colored pen, your growth mindset, and a partner.

The plan:

Our norms:

    • Safe space
      • I can talk about what I know, and I can talk about what I don’t know.
      • I can be brave, vulnerable, kind, and considerate to myself and others while learning.
    • Celebrate opportunities to learn
      • I can learn from mistakes, and I can celebrate what I thought before and now know.

The slide-deck:

Sample feedback and reflections:

This activity helped me see solutions from multiple lenses. Even though the learning progressions were math-based, I can see the potential for using them in science…with some tweaking. When I present STEM challenges to my students I encourage them to use trial and error and to redesign and improve their work. I need to make learning progressions for the next challenge I present!

Connect – I know children need the language to more clearly express their needs in math. They also need to know what they can do instead of saying “I can’t” because they can do something!  Extend – I came away with a better idea of how to quickly assess my students’ levels at the end of a lesson and that allowing time to work with a partner or in a group is very important to extending my students’ learning.  Challenge – to continue to do the work of getting our learning progressions written and finding the time to collaborate as a team.

Connect: Kids need to know what their goals are, as do their teachers. Kids should be able to solve problems in multiple ways. Extend: Kids can have more than one learning progression that they’re working on at once.
Challenge: Allowing the class to explain what progression they are on with me jumping in to help them. 🙂 Becoming comfortable adding these into the classroom daily. It’s been hard for me going from saying state standards for 10 years going to this, but I think this is actually more beneficial!

While I don’t teach math on a daily basis, I found this session beneficial because I had an opportunity to practice using learning progressions.

It was very valuable to actually experience a student’s perspective while going through a learning progression.

#ILoveMySchool