Tag Archives: #TEDTalkTuesday

2 Stories behind creating a movement (TBT Remix)

Happy MoVember!

How might we take a need or an interest and turn it into a movement for good?

Adam Garone: Healthier men, one moustache at a time

It’s about each person coming to this platform, embracing it in their own way, and being significant in their own life.

Nancy Frates: Meet the mom who started the Ice Bucket Challenge

The first thing is, every morning when you wake up, you can choose to live your day in positivity.

 Be passionate. Be genuine. Be hardworking. And don’t forget to be great.

#TEDTalkTuesday: Brave space a.k.a. turning collisions into connections

Yesterday, I had the privilege of attending a session at GISA on Implicit Bias facilitated by Trinity’s very own Gina Quiñones () and Lauren Kinnard ().

Lauren and Gina began the session by setting norms, challenging us to level up from a safe space to a brave space. How might we dare to be brave enough to express what we think and feel? What if we listen to others to learn?

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They challenged us to consider how might we turn our own cultural collisions into more meaningful connections and shared the following TED talk.

Turning cultural collisions into cultural connections: Nadia Younes at TEDxMontrealWomen

I am grateful to work and learn with brave leaders, and I am thankful for all who trust enough to share brave space.

#TEDTalkTuesday: designing adjustable seats

How might we design flexible spaces for learning?  This is a current question in education.  I wonder, however, if we are thinking deeply enough about this question.  I hope that we will take up the challenge of thinking about learning spaces in more ways than furniture.

How might we design to leverage simple solutions that will improve the performance of our learners and dramatically expand our talent pool?

Don’t miss this compelling talk from high school dropout turned Harvard professor and consider how we might change and redesign to address the size differences of all learners.

The Myth of Average: Todd Rose at TEDxSonomaCounty

Our learners are not one-dimensional.  How might we design for jagged learning profiles? What if we nurture individual potential and talent in every learner?

How might we “teach to the edges”?

#TEDTalkTuesday: Ideas can spark a movement

How might we uncover passions and connect ideas? What if we listen to learn?

Maya Penn: Meet a young entrepreneur, cartoonist, designer, activist …

Ideas can spark a movement. Ideas are opportunities and innovation. Ideas truly are what make the world go round. If it wasn’t for ideas, we wouldn’t be where we are now with technology, medicine, art, culture, and how we even live our lives.

We live in a big, diverse and beautiful world, and that makes me even more passionate to save it. But it’s never enough to just to get it through your heads about the things that are happening in our world. It takes to get it through your hearts, because when you get it through your heart, that is when movements are sparked. That is when opportunities and innovation are created, and that is why ideas come to life.

#believe

#TEDTalkTuesday: believe and change the future

Many teachers try to be comforting and sympathetic about math, telling girls not to worry, that they can do well in other subjects. We now know such messages are extremely damaging. (Boaler, n. pag.)

What if the messages are different? What if we send the message I believe in you? How might we change our future?

Brittany Wenger: Global neural network cloud service for breast cancer detection

Wenger began studying neural networks when she was in the seventh grade. She attributes her interest in science to her 7th grade science teacher.  As a high school senior, she won the grand prize in the 2012 Google Science Fair for her project, “Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast Cancer.”

How might we offer opportunities for integrated studies and human-centered problem solving?

What if we send the message I believe in you? How might we change our future?


Boaler, Jo. “Parents’ Beliefs about Math Change Their Children’s Achievement.” Youcubed. Stanford University, n.d. Web. 20 Sept. 2015.

#TEDTalkTuesday: just imagine what you can do

In whom do you have faith?

Jack Andraka: A promising test for pancreatic cancer … from a teenager

Then reality took hold, and over the course of a month, I got 199 rejections out of those 200 emails. One professor even went through my entire procedure, painstakingly — I’m not really sure where he got all this time — and he went through and said why each and every step was like the worst mistake I could ever make. Clearly, the professors did not have as high of an opinion of my work as I did.

However, there is a silver lining. One professor said, “Maybe I might be able to help you, kid.” So, I went in that direction.

Theories can be shared, and you don’t have to be a professor with multiple degrees to have your ideas valued. It’s a neutral space, where what you look like, age or gender — it doesn’t matter. It’s just your ideas that count. For me, it’s all about looking at the Internet in an entirely new way, to realize that there’s so much more to it than just posting duck-face pictures of yourself online.

You could be changing the world.

So if a 15 year-old who didn’t even know what a pancreas was could find a new way to detect pancreatic cancer — just imagine what you could do.

We gotta have faith.

 

#TEDTalkTuesday: the power of yet

How might we teach the power of yet? Is it in the culture of our classroom and our school? What if we include a norm that gives permission to add “yet” to any sentence that has “cannot” in it?

Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve

How are we raising our children? Are we raising them for now instead of yet? Are we raising kids who are obsessed with getting A’s? Are we raising kids who don’t know how to dream big dreams?

Here are some things we can do. First of all, we can praise wisely, not praising intelligence or talent. That has failed. Don’t do that anymore. But praising the process that kids engage in: their effort, their strategies, their focus, their perseverance, their improvement. This process praise creates kids who are hardy and resilient.

What if it is as simple as adding the word yet? How might we change our future?

#believe

#TEDTalkTuesday: Explore more than one path

Yesterday, I wrote that efficiency should never trump understanding.  Today, I’d like to ponder efficiency as one of many paths.

Daniele Quercia: Happy maps
As a scientist and engineer, I’ve focused on efficiency for many years. But efficiency can be a cult,and today I’d like to tell you about a journey that moved me out of the cult and back to a far richer reality.

On this cartography, you’re not only able to see and connect from point A to point B the shortest segments, but you’re also able to see the happy segment, the beautiful path, the quiet path. In tests, participants found the happy, the beautiful, the quiet path far more enjoyable than the shortest one, and that just by adding a few minutes to travel time.

How might we encourage our learners to explore paths in addition to the most efficient?

#TEDTalkTuesday: community problem solving

How are we engaging learners in community-issues problem solving? This week’s TED talk celebrates our own.

Andrew Hennessy – Turning “Lost” Into “Found”

My school faced a problem: An unruly Lost and Found space filled with multiple examples of the same clothing, namely blue fleece cover-ups. My goal was to reinvent the process for labeling, sorting, storing and returning items that get left behind at my school. The solution involved applying a wear-proof QR code that contains critical information used to help reunite the lost item with the owner.  Teachers use a phone based QR app complete with automated parental notification to make the magic happen.

How might we continue to teach community problem solving? What if we teach and learn more about perseverance?

How might we help our learners choose and collaborate projects that they care about?  What if we join a team of learners to discover how the content of our discipline can be used in the process of finding, working on, and solving problems?

#TEDTalkTuesday: Awaken possibility

The perfect back-to-school TEDTalkTuesday message.  In this beautiful talk, Benjamin Zander gives us all a couple of great charges.  Let’s talk about taking up the challenge to move to more one-buttock playing, no matter our “music.”

Benjamin Zander: The transformative power of classical music

I realized my job was to awaken possibility in other people. And of course, I wanted to know whether I was doing that. How do you find out? You look at their eyes. If their eyes are shining, you know you’re doing it. 

 And I say, it’s appropriate for us to ask the question, who are we being as we go back out into the world? And you know, I have a definition of success. For me, it’s very simple. It’s not about wealth and fame and power. It’s about how many shining eyes I have around me.

As we begin again, how might we make small shifts to increase our number of shining eyes?