Differentiation and mathematical flexibility – #LL2LU

How is flexibility encouraged and practiced? Is it expected? Is it anticipated?  What if we collect evidence of mastery of flexibility along side mastery of skill?

From Jo Boaler’s How to Learn Math: for Students:

…we know that what separates high achievers from low achievers is not that high achievers know more math, it is that they interact with numbers flexibly and low achievers don’t.

This past week Rhonda Mitchell (@rgmteach), Early Elementary Division Head, and I collaborated to reword the learning progression for mathematical flexibility so that it is appropriate for Kindergarten and 1st Grade learners.

How might we differentiate to deepen learning?

If we want to support students in learning, and we believe that learning is a product of thinking, then we need to be clear about what we are trying to support. (Ritchhart, Church, and Morrison, 5 pag.)

How might we collect evidence to inform and guide next steps?

Monitoring students’ mastery of a learning progression leads to evidence collection for each building block in a progression. (Popham, Kindle location 2673)

How might we prepare for mid-course corrections to intervene, enrich, and personalize learning for every learner?

By learning to insert feedback loops into our thought, questioning, and decision-making process, we increase the chance of staying on our desired path. Or, if the path needs to be modified, our midcourse corrections become less dramatic and disruptive. (Lichtman, 49 pag.)

What if we consider pairing a skill learning progression with a process learning progression? How might we differentiate to deepen learning?

Students love to give their different strategies and are usually completely engaged and fascinated by the different methods that emerge. Students learn mental math, they have opportunities to memorize math facts and they also develop conceptual understanding of numbers and of the arithmetic properties that are critical to success in algebra and beyond. (Boaler and Williams)


Boaler, Jo, and Cathy Williams. “Fluency Without Fear: Research Evidence on the Best Ways to Learn Math Facts.” Youcubed at Stanford University. Stanford University, 14 Jan. 2015. Web. 22 Feb. 2015.

Lichtman, Grant, and Sunzi. The Falconer: What We Wish We Had Learned in School. New York: IUniverse, 2008. Print.

Popham, W. James (2011-03-07). Transformative Assessment in Action: An Inside Look at Applying the Process. Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. Kindle Edition.

Ritchhart, Ron, Mark Church, and Karin Morrison. Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2011. Print.

One thought on “Differentiation and mathematical flexibility – #LL2LU”

  1. Outstanding, Jill and Rhonda! I really like how you are translating what could be very hard for little ones to understand to something to which they can relate. I wonder what would happen if we asked older students to translate for the younger ones. Might they come up with valuable kid-friendly language?

    Like

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