Guilds: architecture of talent – The Talent Code VTR SPW

How might we transform our classrooms into learning guilds where members learn by doing, through experience, movement, trial-and-error, questioning, and experimentation?

They each took part in the greatest work of art anyone can construct: the architecture of their own talent. (Coyle, 66 pag.)

What if we embed feedback loops, routinely, to celebrate progress and to make frequent, minor course adjustments as we learn and grow?

They became great writers not in spite of the fact that they started out immature and imitative but because they were willing to spend vast amounts of time and energy being immature and imitative, building myelin in the confined, safe space of their little books. Their childhood writings were collaborative deep practice, where they developed storytelling muscles. (Coyle, 57 pag.)

What if time becomes one of the most important variables instead of a determinant of pace? How might we offer learners more laps, more experiences, more trials, more time for trial-error-correction cycles?

TalentCode-Chpt3

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
The Talent Code
Chapter 3: The Brontës, the Z-Boys, and the Renaissance

In short, apprentices spent thousands of hours solving problems, trying and failing and trying again, within the confines of a world built on the systematic production of excellence. (Coyle, 64 pag.)

How might we facilitate experiences that offer opportunities to construct great works of art?

They each took part in the greatest work of art anyone can construct: the architecture of their own talent. (Coyle, 66 pag.)


Coyle, Daniel (2009-04-16). The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. Random House, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

2 thoughts on “Guilds: architecture of talent – The Talent Code VTR SPW”

  1. Your summary of this chapter highlights my continued struggle with giving children the time I know they need to develop deep understanding within the traditional framework of a school schedule. How can we become more creative with the framework we’re bound by in order to “offer learners more laps, more experiences, more trials, more time for trial-error-correction cycles?” Great post!

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  2. Hey, Kato. Thanks for your comment. I’d like to continue this conversation face-to-face. I wonder if part of our #ak12dc opportunity might be directed around a more creative use of the time within our framework.

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