Tag Archives: observation

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 08: Explaining

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was about observing.  Lesson 08 is about explaining.

Project:  What if we doodle to convey additional meaning for a learning progression?
  1. Select or write a new learning progression to highlight a pathway to success for a skill, topic, or process.
  2. Doodle to add additional information and/or meaning.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #LL2LU#ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

 

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 07: Observing

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was about reading and comprehension.  Lesson 07 is about observing.

Project:  Doodle as you observe.  Choose from 2 of the 3 choices listed below:
  1. Observe a colleague teach a lesson.  Doodle what you learn and notice.
  2. Sketch-note through a faculty meeting.
  3. Doodle the big ideas and salient points from a professional development session or workshop.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

Suggestions:

  •  Observe another teacher.  Capture the teacher moves, essential learnings, student questions, and student actions.
  • Capture the big ideas from your next faculty meeting.
  • Illustrate the important points from a conference session or keynote.  Ask the speaker to sign your sketch-note.

Reflecting from aFAAR

In the Junior High, tis the season of conducting Student Course Feedback and, for some, it seems, completing Peer Visits – two of the five components of our Faculty Assessment and Annual Review (FAAR) process. Additionally, a third component of our formative assessment plan – Admin Observation – has been occurring all year. After seeing the note “re-review and process Synergy 8 SCF” on our respective to-do lists for months, Bo Adams and I have finally spent five meetings of second period reviewing and reflecting on our Synergy 8 student course feedback (SCF). Not only did we re-review the feedback to reconsider how things went during the first-semester course, but we also revisited the data in May so that we could pre-plan more effectively for the next iteration of Synergy 8. As we returned to the SCF and discussed the results, we remembered connections in the data that linked to things we read in our peer visit summaries and admin observation notes. We were reminded that student course feedback does not exist by itself. The components of our FAAR process are not intended to be isolated, siloed pieces of professional learning. They can be wonderfully integrated and whole. Also, they are not intended to be summative or evaluative – they are not judgmental pieces of professional evaluation. They are meant to be formative…lenses through which we can view our teaching and learning so as to grow and develop as educators…so that we can adjust our course.

What’s more, by reviewing and reflecting together, we enhanced our field of view and gained richer understanding from the blend of each other’s varied perspectives and reactions. During each of the five periods that we engaged in this collaborative work, we would independently review the data and write to the prompts on the narrative summary tool (“option #2”) for reflecting on one’s SCF – one reflective prompt at a time. Then, we would read and discuss each other’s responses. While this took more time than working through the reflection alone, we both believe we benefitted immensely from the writing, sharing, and dialoguing. We missed things in our individual reflections, but very little fell through any cracks by canvassing the feedback as a team of critical friends.

To share our system of feedback, we decided to use an online, cloud-storage, sharing tool called “Box.” By using Box, we could design some simple webdocs that literally show and archive the connections among the feedback and reflections. Box has a number of great features, including the ability to tag documents and post comments. To view our Box-stored system of feedback, please visit the “Synergy 8 – FAAR” folder.

Soon, our next collective endeavor will be to prepare our 2011-12 Goals and Self-Assessment (a fourth component of FAAR). Because we co-facilitate Synergy 8, we intend to employ the critical friends process again as we continue to prepare for our next team of Synergy learners. The manner in which we reviewed and reflected on our system of feedback has set up and primed our ability and enthusiasm to enhance the Synergy experience for the upcoming school year.

In addition to our course-specific questions, we are also engaged in thinking about some critical learning questions for ourselves and our FAAR process (and they may be good questions for you, too):

  • Can you learn more deeply reviewing feedback with a colleague? How can we assist each other in learning more deeply?
  • How can we build a common understanding of the needs of our learners? How can we find a richer understanding of ourselves as teammates and co-facilitators?
  • Do you have a team of critical friends? What feedback are you collecting and considering so that you can grow?
  • Would you learn more by sharing the results of your feedback with another for reflection and co-interpretation? How will we grow and learn together if we are not sharing our struggles and our successes?
  • What have we learned from this process that we can facilitate for our younger learners next semester? How can we model and implement a richer reflection and critical friends system as part of the course?
Note: This post is cross-posted at Bo Adams’s It’s About Learning.