Tag Archives: Peter Reynolds

Summer PD: Day 1 Make Sense; Persevere

Summer Literacy and Mathematics Professional Learning
June 5-9, 2017
Day 1 – Make Sense and Persevere
Jill Gough and Becky Holden

Today’s focus and essential learning:

We want all mathematicians to be able to say:

I can make sense of tasks
and persevere in solving them.

(but… what if I can’t?)

Great teachers lead us just far enough down a path so we can challenge for ourselves. They provide us just enough insight so we can work toward a solution that makes us, makes me want to jump up and shout out the solution to the world, makes me want to step to the next higher level.  Great teachers somehow make us want to ask the questions that they want us to answer, overcome the challenge that they, because they are our teacher, believe we need to overcome. (Lichtman, 20 pag.)

… designed to help students slow down and really think about problems rather than jumping right into solving them. In making this a routine approach to solving problems, she provided students with a lot of practice and helped them develop a habit of mind for reading and solving problems.  (Flynn, 19 pag.)

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Agenda and Tasks:

Slide deck:

Resources:

Connect disconnected pathways with multiple representations

A doodler is connecting neurological pathways with perviously disconnected pathways.  A doodler is concentrating intently, sifting through information, conscious and otherwise, and – much more often than we realize – generating massive insights.  (Brown, 11 pag.)

How might we test this? What if we engage with our curriculum to experience connecting disconnected pathways, to generate insights, to make thinking visible?

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It is the relationship between the teacher, the student, and the content – not the qualities of any one of them by themselves – that determines the nature of instructional practice, and each corner of the instructional core has its own particular role and resources to bring to the instructional process. (City and Elmore, 22 pag.)

What if we make a small shift in our role and resources to bring multiple representations to our practice?

Screen Shot 2015-01-21 at 7.11.21 PM …, it is the change in the knowledge and skill that the teachers bring to the practice, the type of content to which students gain access, and the role that students play in their own learning that determine what students will know and be able to do. (City and Elmore, 24 pag.)

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These learners need doodling in order to focus more acutely on what’s being said, and they demonstrate better recall when they’re allowed to doodle than when they’re not.  (Brown, 21 pag.)

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Just make a mark and see where it takes you. (Reynolds, n. pag.)


Brown, Sunni. The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently. New York: Portfolio/Penguin, 2014. Print.

City, Elizabeth A. Instructional Rounds in Education: A Network Approach to Improving Teaching and Learning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education, 2009. Print.

Reynolds, Peter. The Dot. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick, 2003. Print.

Sketchnotes, Doodles and Visual Thinking Jam – #GaETC2014

Jill Gough (@jgough) and Shelley Paul (@lottascales) are facilitating a session entitled Sketchnotes, Doodles & Visual Thinking Jam at the  Georgia Educational Technology Conference.

The provocation:

How might we incorporate symbols and doodles (“on paper” and digitally) in order to better express ideas, and summarize/synthesize our learning and reflections? How might notetaking become more personal, visual, brain-compatible and shareable across networks? Come join an introduction, conversation, exploration and practice session to learn and share about the “doodle revolution” and how we might grow ourselves and our learners through visual thinking?

The plan:

The norms:

  • I can talk about what I know, and I can talk about what I don’t know.
  • I can be brave, vulnerable, kind, and considerate to myself and others while learning.
  • I can learn from mistakes, and I can celebrate what I thought before and now know.

The slide deck:

The sketchbook handout:

photo[1]

The reflection:  Connect, Extend, Challenge

    • How do these ideas connect to what you already know?
    • What new ideas did you get that extend or push your thinking in new directions?
    • What is now a challenge for you to get your mind around? What questions, wonderings, and puzzles do you now have?

[Cross posted on Finding the Signal]

Visual Note Taking – Join the Doodle Revolution, #GISAConference

Jill Gough (@jgough) and Shelley Paul (@lottascales) are facilitating a session entitled Visual Note Taking – Join the Doodle Revolution at the 2014 Georgia Independent School Association (GISA) conference.

The provocation:

How might note taking become more active, personal, brain-compatible and shareable? How might we incorporate symbols and doodles to improve listening, better express ideas, summarize/synthesize learning and make connections? Join a conversation and practice session to explore how we might grow ourselves and our learners through doodling and visual thinking.

The plan:

The norms:

  • I can talk about what I know, and I can talk about what I don’t know.
  • I can be brave, vulnerable, kind, and considerate to myself and others while learning.
  • I can learn from mistakes, and I can celebrate what I thought before and now know.

The slide deck:

The sketchbook handout:

IMG_5680

The reflection:  Connect, Extend, Challenge

    • How do these ideas connect to what you already know?
    • What new ideas did you get that extend or push your thinking in new directions?
    • What is now a challenge for you to get your mind around? What questions, wonderings, and puzzles do you now have?

[Cross posted on Finding the Signal]

Be the world to someone…Save the shoes…

Connecting dots:

Watch…

Connect to…

Mark Bezos:

Don’t wait…If you have something to give, give it now…Every day offers us an opportunity to affect [a life]…Get in the game…Save the shoes…

I am here by Peter Reynolds:

To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world.