Listening, trust, and feedback – A More Beautiful Question VTR SPW

Bennett says that within IDEO, the company recognizes it’s important to create an environment where it’s safe to ask “stupid” questions. (Berger, 80 pag.)

It’s about culture and atmosphere and bravery. Are we striving for progress or perfection?

As the writer Peter Sims noted in Harvard Business Review, most of us, throughout our school years and even in the business world, have been taught to hold back ideas until they are polished and perfect. (Berger 120 pag.)

What if we embrace risk-taking to show our work and thinking early and often? Are we taking actions to teach and model constructive critique for learning?

In committing to an idea, it becomes critical to find a way to share it in order to get feedback. (Berger, 118 pag.)

If we show work in progress, are we fearful that the feedback will cause a shutdown rather than a new iteration?

Which brings us back to culture and climate.

AMBQ-Chpt3

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
A More Beautiful Question
Chapter 3: The Why, What if, and How of Innovative Questioning

How are we listening to learners – every learner? What if we use technology to offer everyone a voice and an opportunity to question, to see the thinking of others, and to offer feedback to themselves and others?

Are we listening deeply to each other? Are we observing – paying attention – closely to learn?

Why are we afraid to show our work? What if feedback is asked for as well as given? How might we shift our culture?


Note:

Chapter 3 is also full of interesting, important questions and ideas to ponder. These ideas and questions connect, for me, to assessment, design thinking, and makery.

I have many notes in my book. I am part of a cohort reading this book. I know that others will highlight and help discuss additional ideas from this chapter.


Berger, Warren (2014-03-04). A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas . BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING. Kindle Edition.

Be curious; overcome fear; ask – A More Beautiful Question VTR SPW

[learners] may be self-censoring their questions due to cultural pressures. (Berger, 58 pag.)

What are the cultural norms  in our learning community around asking questions? Who has permission to ask questions?

But this issue of “Who gets to ask the questions in class?” touches on purpose, power, control, and, arguably, even race and social class. (Berger, 56 pag.)

If learners are self-censoring their questions because of cultural pressures, who really has permission to ask questions?

How might we create space and opportunity for additional voices to contribute questions? What if we leverage tools – technology, protocols, strategies – to offer every learner new ways to have a voice?

What would it look and sound like in the average classroom if we wanted to make “being wrong” less threatening? (Berger, 50 pag.)

What is to be gained from using  feedback loops as a way to make the possibility of “being wrong” less threatening?

Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 12.55.21 PM

Image from Kato Nim's 4th Grade Class

How might we show that what we don’t know gives direction for learning and growth?

AMBQ-Chpt2

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
A More Beautiful Question
Chapter 2: Why We Stop Questioning?

If learners are self-censoring their questions because of cultural pressures, what actions should/can/will be taken?


Note:

Chapter 2 is full of interesting, important questions and ideas to ponder.

Why do kids ask so many questions? (And how do we really feel about that?) Why does questioning fall off a cliff? Can a school be built on questions? Who is entitled to ask questions in class? If we’re born to inquire, then why must it be taught? (Berger, 39 pag.)

I have many notes in my book. I am part of a cohort reading this book. I know that others will highlight and help discuss additional ideas from this chapter.


Berger, Warren (2014-03-04). A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas . BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING. Kindle Edition.

Uncertainty, next steps, tone – A More Beautiful Question VTR SPW

What process do we have in place to help learners think and act in the face of  uncertainty to keep taking next steps? What is the tone of the atmosphere in our learning spaces?

Good questioners tend to be aware of, and quite comfortable with, their own ignorance (Berger, 16 pag.)

How are we encouraging questions about what is not known? How often do we hear learners say “I know this is a dumb question but, …” and how do we respond?

One of the most important things questioning does is to enable people to think and act in the face of uncertainty. As Steve Quatrano of the Right Question Institute puts it, forming questions helps us “to organize our thinking around what we don’t know.”  (Berger, 19 pag.)

AMBQ-Chpt1

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
A More Beautiful Question
Chapter 1: The Power of Inquiry

MIT’s Joi Ito says that as we try to come to terms with a new reality that requires us to be lifelong learners (instead of just early-life learners), we must try to maintain or rekindle the curiosity, sense of wonder, inclination to try new things, and ability to adapt and absorb that served us so well in childhood. We must become, in a word, neotenous (neoteny being a biological term that describes the retention of childlike attributes in adulthood). (Berger, 24 pag.)

How might we become more neotenous to notice and note without labels? What if we create conditions where what we don’t know is safe to discuss?

To do so, we must rediscover the tool that kids use so well in those early years: the question. Ito puts it quite simply: “You don’t learn unless you question.” (Berger, 24 pag.)

Again…

What process do we have in place to help learners think and act in the face of  uncertainty to keep taking next steps? What is the tone of the atmosphere in our learning spaces?


Berger, Warren (2014-03-04). A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas . BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING. Kindle Edition.

Seed to cede – A More Beautiful Question VTR SPW

A beautiful question is an ambitious yet actionable question that can begin to shift the way we perceive or think about something— and that might serve as a catalyst to bring about change. (Berger, 8 pag.)

I was running when my audiobook read the following to me.

To encourage or even allow questioning is to cede power— not something that is done lightly in hierarchical companies or in government organizations, or even in classrooms, where a teacher must be willing to give up control to allow for more questioning. (Berger, 6 pag.)

Because I was running, I heard

To encourage or even allow questioning is to seed power …

Since questioning is like breathing, how might we grow – plant seeds and nurture – power and control to rekindle the questioning spark and allow for more questioning?

AMBQ-Intro-SPW

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
A More Beautiful Question
Introduction: Why Question?

With so much evidence in its favor and with everyone from Einstein to Jobs in its corner, why, then, is questioning underappreciated in business, undertaught in schools, and underutilized in our everyday lives? (Berger, 3 pag.)


Berger, Warren (2014-03-04). A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas . BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING. Kindle Edition.

#TEDTalkTuesday from A More Beautiful Question

One of the choices for summer reading in our community is A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Idea by Warren Berger (@GlimmerGuy).

The following three are featured in the book, and I thought we might want to hear from them to add depth to the reading.

Mick Ebeling: The invention that unlocked a locked-in artist

Jack Andraka: A promising test for pancreatic cancer … from a teenager

Dan Meyer: Math class needs a makeover

Enjoy!

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part II: Schools)

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part II: Schools)

What does the cutting edge picture of the new school look like? How does technology fit into this picture? For independent schools that want to design new programs or new educational models, what are today’s exemplars?

John Katzman: The future of schools and school design.

Russ Whitehurst: The challenges we face in rethinking the K12 education model and curricula.

Facilitated discussion (Kim Wargo): Do independent schools need to reinvent themselves to become true 21st century schools and if so, how?

From John Katzman:

JohnKatzman

From Russ Whitehurst:

RussWhitehurst


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.

 

 

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part I: Teacher Education)

Developing 21st Century Teachers and Schools (Part I: Teacher Education)

What does a successful teacher education program (certificate/badge-based and degree-based) look like? What needs to change to make teacher education both accessible and affordable?

Marcy Singer-Gabella, Vanderbilt Faculty: 21st century teacher education.

Facilitated discussion (Vince Durnan): What’s the pathway to a more professionalized independent school teaching force? How do we evaluate teacher success and quality if we don’t have independent school teacher “standards”? How do schools support that end?

From Marcy Singer-Gabella:

How might we see teaching as a team sport? What if we team to learn and to teach where there is need?  How might we  change opportunities for learning if we leverage teacher strength to support learner need? What if we remix and partner to serve all learners?

How do we attract and retain high quality teachers? How do we help our teachers continue to learn and to lead?

MarcySingerGabella

How are we attending to systems of complexity? Marcy Singer-Gabella recommends grappling with the  Cynefin Framework from Dave Snowden.

Another model for mentoring from ‘s Mentoring Program: See How It Works.


I am honored to be an invited participant as NAIS gathers a group of expert educators, psychologists, and thought leaders at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education in Nashville, Tennessee, to discuss advances in the science of learning and what it tells us about teaching, curricula, and schools on May 19-20 for its fourth Deep Dive: NAIS Explores the Science of Learning and 21st Century Schools.