Deep practice: struggle, mistakes, learning – The Talent Code VTR SPW

How might we deepen learning experiences? What if we see small mistakes and failures as opportunities to learn?

Deep practice is built on a paradox: struggling in certain targeted ways—operating at the edges of your ability, where you make mistakes—makes you smarter. Or to put it a slightly different way, experiences where you’re forced to slow down, make errors, and correct them—as you would if you were walking up an ice-covered hill, slipping and stumbling as you go—end up making you swift and graceful without your realizing it. (Coyle, 18 pag.)

What if, in school (and out), we become serious about learning from mistakes? How will we learn from a mistake if it is erased, hidden, or ignored? What if we learn and share and seek feedback?

The second reason deep practice is a strange concept is that it takes events that we normally strive to avoid—namely, mistakes—and turns them into skills. To understand how deep practice works, then, it’s first useful to consider the unexpected but crucial importance of errors to the learning process. (Coyle, 20 pag.)

How can we tell when deep practice happens and deep learning is in progress?

Making progress became a matter of small failures, a rhythmic pattern of botches, as well as something else: a shared facial expression. (Coyle, 13 pag)

TalentCode-Chpt1

Summer Reading using VTR: Sentence-Phrase-Word:
The Talent Code
Chapter 1: The Sweet Spot

How do we find and get into “the zone” to learn deeply? How might we help every learner dwell in their sweet spot, learning at the edge of their capabilities?


Coyle, Daniel (2009-04-16). The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. Random House, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

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