Category Archives: Questions

Day 31 (Day 1 Week 7) Learning from home: We are teaching and they are learning – Evidence and Math

I know this is hard to believe, but in several of the team meetings I attended today, some of our strong, motivated, creative teachers worried aloud, bravely (and, often in tears):

I don’t want to let our students and our families down. They are working so hard. They are learning so much. I am afraid that I am not doing enough to serve them, you. I am letting y’all [my team] down.

Hardly anything consoles these wonderful, dedicated teachers.

Fear of not being enough. Wow!

So, friends, I’m here to say that you are enough:
teachers and parents.

I want you to talk back to that fear. Tell it all the things you are doing: video production, planning, feedback, assessment, nurturing children, engaging with and teaching children, meeting with your team, and countless many more activities all directed at the social, emotional, physical, mental, and academic wellness of our learners.

There is evidence that our teachers are teaching and our students are learning. Lots of evidence. Just flip back through the last 30 days of these Learning From Home posts. Look through #TrinityLearns – ’cause we are!

So… what to do when evidence is not enough?

Hmm…

Oh, I know…

This is so me…

Let’s do some math.

My family loves the Marvel movies. There is ongoing debate in my home on the betterness of watching them in order of their release or in chronological order. (I wonder… have you seen these movies?)

Here are some data:

Did you know that Endgame, a 3-hour movie with a cast of 62 and a crew of I-can’t-tell-how-many, was filmed in 153 days?

From Quora: “Endgame has started on the 10th August 2017 and finished on the 11th of January 2018 so it took 155 days in total, 5 thirty one day months end to end.) They probably took Christmas eve and Christmas Day off, so it could actually be 153 days of filming and this probably wasn’t the finished product, with editing and CGI still needed to be added to this massive production.”

So, 153 days at 10 hours/day of filming is 1530 hours of filming for a 3-hour movie, or 510 hours of filming for each hour of the film. And, that does not include editing, processing, scriptwriting, etc. Nor, does it include the planning, location scouting, and scriptwriting. And, these are professional actors and filmmakers.

Let’s say you teach Kindergarten at Trinity. The sum total of minutes of video for today, Monday, April 27 is approximately… no… let’s add it up.

So, if my math is correct, that’s 44 minutes and 21 seconds worth of teacher produced video just for today.  Can we call it 3/4 of an hour?

If we call it 3/4 of an hour and if our teachers were professional moviemakers, that would be 38.25 days of work to produces just shy of 45 minutes of video.

3 hours of movie in 153 days of filming reduces to
1 hour of video in 51 days.

3/4 of an hour of video would then be 3/4 of 51 days
or 38 1/4 days.

Now, teachers are not professional filmmakers. We are professional educators trained to love, nurture, guide, teach, reteach, and shepherd our students through their learning journeys.

In addition to video production, teachers facilitate morning meetings, small group work for differentiation, book clubs, math small groups, and many other things our students need each day.

Wow! What teachers are doing for our students and with teammates is important, hard, intentional, time-consuming work.

So here are questions to consider:

  • Are we focused on learning? Are the lessons and videos we develop intentionally planned and executed?
  • Is collaboration our culture? Are we working in intentional, focused ways as teams?

Results guide our decisions.
We are teaching and they are learning.

The math says so, and the evidence says so too.

School does not feel like school right now.

Yet, we are teaching and they are learning, and we are learning, too.

We are professional educators trained and driven to love, nurture, guide, teach, reteach, and shepherd our students through their learning journeys.

Results guide our decisions.

We are teaching and they are learning.
(The math says so.)
The evidence says so.

Day 30 (Day 5 Week 6) Learning from home: Celebrate small successes; rest and renew

Small successes [are] not stopping points
but stepping-stones. (Coyle, 188 pag.)

How might we listen on many levels? What if we change our focus to concentrate on the process of learning in addition to the products of learning?

“Great teachers focus on what the student is saying or doing,” he says, “and are able, by being so focused and by their deep knowledge of the subject matter, to see and recognize the inarticulate stumbling, fumbling effort of the student who’s reaching toward mastery, and then connect to them with a targeted message.” (Coyle, 177 pag.)

What if we teach (and learn) that practice makes progress and celebrate growth over time? Sometimes, we see the fruits of our labor immediately, and sometimes it takes years. It’s about small successes and stepping stones.

We are so grateful to our teachers, parents, students, and friends. I know it is difficult to see day-to-day because of the complexities of learning and teaching, but we are teaching and they are learning.

There is ample evidence that we are teaching and they are learning in the #TrinityLearns love spree that we share day after day.

Please take care of yourself. 

“As you grow older, you will discover that you have two hands, one for helping yourself, the other for helping others.” — Maya Angelou

Rest and renew over the weekend.

Breathe in for a 4-count and out for an 8-count. It does a body good. #SuperBetter #PowerBreath

Check out “Power Breath” Is Better Than Deep Breathing for Relaxing Mind and Body from the Big Think.

Just by changing how you breathe for one minute, you can shift your entire nervous system from a stressful state to a highly relaxed state. Muscles relax, heart rate decreases, digestion improves, and state of mind improves. If you’re feeling any kind of bad, this powerful shift is sure to help. (McGonigal, 97 pag.)

We need each other.
Our brains need other brains.
Our hearts need other hearts.

You are in my heart and my prayers.

#ThankYouTeachers


Coyle, Daniel (2009-04-16). The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How. Random House, Inc.. Kindle Edition.

McGonigal, Jane. Super Better: The Power of Living Gamefully. Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Day 29 (Day 4 Week 6) Learning from home: Lean on me; go on a love spree; and breathe, just breathe

Will you take 4.5 minutes to watch and listen to Bill Withers, Stevie Wonder, John Legend perform “Lean On Me” at the 2015 Induction Ceremony?

Sometimes in our lives
We all have pain, we all have sorrow.
But if we are wise,
We know that there’s always tomorrow.

From Self-Reg: How to Help Your Child (and You) Break the Stress Cycle and Successfully Engage with Life, one of our Summer Learning choices:

We need others. Our brains need other brains. Not just when we are babies but throughout our lives. But by the same token, other brains can be such a stress. How can one and the same phenomenon have such opposite effects? (Shanker, 162 pag.)

And from Permission to Feel: Unlocking the Power of Emotions to Help Our Kids, Ourselves, and Our Society Thrive, my current read:

Strong, negative emotions (fear, anger, anxiety, hopelessness) tend to narrow our minds—it’s as though our peripheral vision has been cut off because we’re so focused on the peril that’s front and center. There’s actually a physiological side to this phenomenon. When these negative feelings are present, our brains respond by secreting cortisol, the stress hormone. This inhibits the prefrontal cortex from effectively processing information, so even at a neurocognitive level our ability to focus and learn is impaired. (Brackett, 28 pag.)

So… what to do? Breathe; just breathe.

From Jane McGonigal’s Super Better: The Power of Living Gamefully, another of our Summer Learning choices:

You’ve probably tried deep, slow breathing to calm yourself down. But there’s actually a more useful breathing technique, one that can reduce stress, decrease pain, increase concentration, halt migraines, and prevent panic attacks. What to do: Breathe in while you count slowly to 4. Exhale while you count to 8. In for 4, out for 8. Repeat for at least one minute. This is a bit more challenging than it sounds! The trick is to always exhale for twice as long as you inhale. (McGonigal, 96 pag.)

Why it works: Breathing at this rhythm increases your heart rate variability, the slight differences in the length of time between your heartbeats, from one to the next.

The more variation, the better. In the long term, high heart rate variability protects against stress, anxiety, inflammation, and pain. In the short term, increased heart rate variability has a huge impact on your nervous system. It shifts your body from what scientists call sympathetic stimulation (which, when activated by stress, pain, or anxiety, triggers a fight-or-flight mode) to parasympathetic stimulation (a calm-and-connect mode).

Just by changing how you breathe for one minute, you can shift your entire nervous system from a stressful state to a highly relaxed state. Muscles relax, heart rate decreases, digestion improves, and state of mind improves. If you’re feeling any kind of bad, this powerful shift is sure to help. (McGonigal, 97 pag.)

One of my dearest friends wrote to me yesterday:

I’ve been trying sometimes to look at twitter, and I decided this morning I’m not sure whether I can do it anymore. Almost every tweet I read emanates anger and doesn’t assume good intentions from others.

I replied:

Just read our #TrinityLearns feed. It is so joyful.  

This really good advice (from me, I know) is based on another of Jane McGonigal’s Super Better power-ups:

SOCIAL RESILIENCE

Love spree! Check the clock or start a timer. You’ve got three minutes to like, favorite, or leave a positive comment on as many social media posts from friends and family as you can. If you’re not on social media, use your three minutes to send quick “you’re awesome” or “thinking of you” emails and text messages to as many people as you can. You’ve only got three minutes, so don’t think—just spread the love! (McGonigal, 175 pag.)

Just in case social media is bringing you down, I’ll be your filter. Just read, watch, like, and comment with an appreciation of these beautiful artifacts of learning, resilience, joy, courage, and happiness.

Don’t just scroll. Play the video. Flip through all the images by using the arrows.  Find learning, resilience, joy, courage, and happiness. Spread the #TrinityLearns love.

We need others. Our brains need other brains.

Lean on me when you’re not strong
I’ll be your friend, I’ll help you carry on
For it won’t be long
‘Til I’m gonna need somebody to lean on.

So, intentionally find the good: Go on a #SuperBetter Love Spree.

And, breathe (out longer than in by a factor of 2);  just breathe.

If there is a load
You have to bear
That you can’t carry
I’m right up the road
I’ll share your load
If you just call me.

You are in my heart and my prayers.
(OK, and Brené Brown’s prayers – thank you, Brené.)

God, give [us] the strength and courage to
contribute more than [we} criticize.

#ThankYouTeachers

That means you too, parents!


Brackett,Ph.D., Marc. Permission to Feel: Unlocking the Power of Emotions to Help Our Kids, Ourselves, and Our Society Thrive. Celadon Books. Kindle Edition.

McGonigal, Jane. Super Better: The Power of Living Gamefully. Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Shanker, Stuart. Self-Reg: How to Help Your Child (and You) Break the Stress Cycle and Successfully Engage with Life. Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Day 28 (Day 3 Week 6) Learning from home: Give us the strength to contribute

I’ve been thinking more about yin and yang: seemingly opposite or contrary forces may actually be complementary, interconnected, and interdependent.

On my ride last night, I listened to The King Center hosting a conversation featuring Dr. #BrenéBrown and Dr. #BerniceAKing moderated by #SamCollier. In case you missed it, take a listen.

 

Dr. Bernice King explained that this conversation was “going to be heavy in a light way. These are serious times, and as we get through them, we have to do it in a way that it doesn’t weigh too heavily on us.”

Heavy in a light way.

Hmm…seemingly opposite or contrary forces that may actually be complementary, interconnected, and interdependent.

Dr. Brené Brown reminded us, again, that there is no courageous behavior without vulnerability.

As our faculty share how they are in yin and yang fashion, we hear

I feel exhausted and encouraged.

I feel creative and criticized.

I feel celebrated and criticized.

I feel like I’m working past my capacity and that it is not enough.

I feel like I’ve found a rhythm and I wonder how to mix it up.

I feel scared and confident.

I feel strong and sad.

I feel brave and afraid.

I love my new commute and I’d give anything to go back to school, traffic and all.

I see and celebrate my students’ successes, and yet, I feel like I’m failing.

An open note from me to you…

My dear teachers and parents,

What you are doing is hard. You are not trained for what you have been asked to do.  No one is.  Yet, you are teaching and they are learning. (And so are we!)

Teachers, we know you miss your students, their hugs, smiles, laughter, and tiny, powerful moments. Google Meet connects us in yin-and-yang ways. We can see, hear, talk with, and laugh with each other, yet we miss the physical presence of our community. We applaud your creativity, your intentional planning, the volumes of feedback, and the care and concern you offer our students and their families as you attend to your family’s needs too.

Parents, we know that you are working, worried, and weary. You are tackling our learning plans as you can for your children. You know how to read, compute, investigate, and write. It is incredibly complex to teach these skills, and yet you press on. We applaud your engagement, effort, and willingness to lead learning. It’s really difficult to teach those you love the most, and you do it anyway.

Teachers and parents, we are on the same team focused on the care of our students and children.  We have the same goals, hopes, and dreams. We wish the venue was Trinity School. There is so much to miss, yet we are gaining so much.  We know each other so much better differently now.

This critical work – schooling – feels opposite or contrary to the norm, and yet it is actually complementary, interconnected, and interdependent. We thank you for your growth mindset as well as your trust and faith in each other.

I love you, and I miss you.

I miss you, even though I talk with you more often now that we are apart.

#GoDoGood #CountItAllJoy
Together and apart, you are in my heart.
 
Jill
 
 Our children are in school and learning even though the building is closed. So, I leave you with evidence of joyful, deep learning at Trinity School.

 
Dr. Brené Brown shared this private, daily prayer in the King Center conversation, and I used it today to pray for all of us.
 
God, give [us] the strength and courage to
contribute more than [we} criticize.
 

Day 27 (Day 2 Week 6) Learning from home: We are teaching and they are learning

I wonder if, when the house is finished, we forget the foundational infrastructure required for function.  How does water get into and out of my house? Who ran the wires so that our lamps illuminate our space? Who did the work, and what work was done, prior to the slab being poured?

Earlier, I wrote about the Goldilocks conditions that we are experience right now.

Trinity School faculty teams are busy, busy, busy.  Each week our dedicated and determined faculty unite as teams and plan multi-sensory learning experiences for our young students. It is tiring and so great! We are learning more and more each day.  Some of these weekly plans can be up to 30 pages long for a grade-level.  In earlier posts, you can find examples from Fifth Grade, Third Grade, and First Grade.

The infrastructure is complex, elegant, beautiful, and hidden though seemingly visible.  At first glance, these plans are ready, finished, prepared. But think deeply for a moment…

  • How much time did it take to produce the videos, design the lessons in Seesaw, and select appropriate books from Epic?
    #ThankYouTeachers
  • How much time does it take to offer individual students (and their parents) feedback in Seesaw and in Google docs?
    #ThankYouTeachers
  • Isn’t it amazing that Art and PE support reading and math? I wonder how much work and energy went into the intentional coordination of interdisciplinary, connected content?
    #ThankYouTeachers
  • And – most importantly – how much time does it take to plan engaging, happy, enriching morning meetings where our students can name and claim their goals, connect with their peers, and have a voice in their classroom?
    #ThankYouTeachers

The infrastructure is complex, elegant, beautiful, and hidden.  #ThankYouTeachers

#TogetherAndApart

The building is closed.

School is open.

Here is some of the evidence:

Remember that this is a marathon not a sprint. As Sarah Barton Thomas reminds us:

In these days of constant change around us, we can hone in on the basics-pace, hydrate, rest, and trust.

#ThankYourTeachers

#ThankYouTeachers

Day 26 (Day 1 Week 6) Learning from home: We are teaching and they are learning

From GOA’s article, Flexibility, Wellness, Sustainability: GOA’s Review of School Schedules for Learning Online by Eric Hudson:

    1. Flexibility: Learning and working remotely looks different from student to student, family to family, and educator to educator. Flexibility in schedule is important.
    2. Wellness: Worry about screen time, stress, and pace while learning remotely drove many schools to consider carefully how much and how often students were expected to be on video calls.
    3. Sustainability: Maintaining a rigid schedule of primarily synchronous learning is overly demanding for most students and teachers, and it was impossible for most international and boarding school respondents, where students, educators, and their families are spread across as many as 12 different time zones.

Again and again, we are asked, “will they be behind next year?”

While school does not look like school because we are all at home, our teachers are working in teams, communicating with the grade-level teachers around them. We will be ready in the fall. Our students will be ready in the fall.

Here are some examples, artifacts, and evidence of learning from home:

Early Learners

 

Pre-K

Kindergarten

First Grade

Second Grade

Third Grade

Fourth Grade

Fifth Grade

Sixth Grade

Art

Music

PE

The building is closed, but our school is open.

While school does not look like school because we are all at home, our teachers are working in teams, communicating with the grade-level teachers around them. We will be ready in the fall. Our students will be ready in the fall.

We are teaching and they are learning.

#ThankYourTeacher

#ThankYouTeachers

Day 25 (Day 5 Week 5) Learning from home: Known and heard

From our friends at Leadership + Design:

“The number one reason teams (remote or otherwise) fail is a lack of maintenance.” @RyanMBurke

How do we facilitate intentional opportunities to maintain relationships?  

At this week’s Grade-Level Team Leaders meeting (and then in subsequent team meetings), we started this way:

How might seemingly opposite or contrary forces
actually be complementary, interconnected, and interdependent?

Check-in: How are you entering this meeting?

Yin and Yang: I am  _______ and ________.

It was powerful. Some of the comments shared were

    • I am exhausted and encouraged.
    • I am stressed and strong.
    • I am tired and learning.
    • I am hopeful and heartened.
    • I am proud and struggling.

I regret not capturing all of the shared comments.

Now, everyone knows that my natural tendency is to lean toward tasks and sometimes I forego maintenance.  So, we did not linger in maintenance once everyone shared. Just as I was ready to send them off to small group meetings, Laura asked if she could make a comment.

She thanked us for the important check-in, the opportunity to say how she was, and the opportunity to listen to her teammates.  She reminded us that it is easy to assume everyone else has it together. She realized she is not alone. She felt known and heard.

We are a team: exhausted yet encouraged, stressed yet joyful, hopeful and heartened.

No one is alone in this struggle. Yet, it is easy to silently carry the weight of struggle and worry.

We are not failing.

It is okay to feel joy and sadness.

It is okay to feel exhausted and encouraged.

This is hard, and you are creative.

We are together and apart: complementary, interconnected, and interdependent.

I love you.

I miss you.

I genuinely want to know how you are.

Will you share in the comment below, on Twitter, or on Facebook?

Day 24 (Day 4 Week 5) Learning from home: Lead with hope not fear, it’s about mindset

What if we lead with our hopes instead of our fears?

Learning is not an insta-grow experience.

Time is essential. Struggle – working at the edges of ability – is critical.  Patience is required as is a growth mindset. It might take a while to see evidence of growth. What if we practice, struggle, share, and seek feedback?

During this time of learning from home, how are we intentionally developing and leveraging growth mindset? How do we coach ourselves and our learners using Carol Dweck’s first steps to changing your mindset?

Step1. Learn to hear your fixed mindset “voice.”

Step 2. Recognize that you have a choice.

Step 3. Talk back to it with a growth mindset voice.

Step 4. Take the growth mindset action.

In  The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work, Shawn Achor writes:

Move the fulcrum so that all the advantage goes to a negative mindset, and we never rise off the ground. Move the fulcrum to a positive mindset, and the lever’s power is magnified— ready to move everything up. (Achor, 65 pag.)

In Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Carole Dweck writes:

“And if abilities can be expanded – if change and growth are possible – then there are still many paths to success.” (Dweck, 39 pag.)

In The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born : It’s Grown, Here’s How, Daniel Coyle writes:

“Why does slowing down work so well? The myelin model offers two reasons.  First, going slow allows you to attend more closely to errors, creating a higher degree of precision with each firing – and when it comes to growing myelin, precision is everything.  As football coach Tom Martinez likes to say ‘It’s not how fast you can do it. It’s how slowly you can do it correctly.’ Second, going slow helps the practitioner to develop something even more important: a working perception of the skill’s internal blueprint – the shape and rhythm of the interlocking skill circuits.”  (p. 85)

Finally, from Carol Dweck’s TED Talk:

Praising the process that kids engage in: their effort, their strategies, their focus, their perseverance, their improvement. This process praise creates kids who are hardy and resilient.

Slow down. Listen. Listen to your fear and worry. Learn to hear your fixed mindset “voice.” Recognize that the future is not fixed. There is more time to grow, to struggle, to reflect, to question, and to learn. Talk back to your inner worry. You are learning alongside the children in your care. Name your hopes. Take action in hope. There are many paths to success. Move the fulcum to the positive mindset to magnify hope and learning.

Growth over time…patience required.

What if we lead with our hopes instead of our fears?


Achor, Shawn. The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work. New York: Broadway, 2010. Print.

Coyle, Daniel. The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born : It’s Grown, Here’s How. New York: Bantam, 2009. 217.  Print.

Dweck, Carol S. Mindset: the New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House, 2006. 39. Print.

Day 23 (Day 3 Week 5) Learning from home: Connecting ideas, connecting learners

At Trinity, we run weekly sessions around best practices in mathematics education. Embolden Your Inner Mathematician is a course designed to deepen the practice, pedagogy, and assessment of mathematics.

We commit to curation of best practices, connections between mathematical ideas, and communication to learn and share with a broad audience. We know that providing multiple pathways to success invites diverse learners’ ideas to the conversation.

Tonight, I offered a synchronous session for teachers:

Free PD for Math Teachers:
Embolden Your Inner Mathematician
(at a distance) – Session 2:

Be both author and illustrator of mathematical understanding

At Trinity, we balance product and process. We are process-oriented and want our students to learn the practice of mathematics as well as the procedures. If I am to tell the whole truth, we want our students to be strong practitioners of mathematics first and foremost. We expect our students and teachers to build procedural fluency from conceptual understanding.

In tonight’s session, we worked on the following mathematical practices.

We used Pattern 127 from Fawn Nguyen’s Visual Patterns.

Can you see how we anticipated ways that students might see and show their thinking? We connected structure to regularity in repeated reasoning by intentionally making our thinking visible and noticed what changed and what stayed the same.

Most of what was done was not new in content. However, there were some intentional teacher moves that were new to the teachers gathered this evening.  We used quick images instead of showing all three figures at once. We discussed different ways of seeing the 5 in figure 1. Next, we shared the same and new structures noticed in figure 2 and again in figure 3. Only then did we look at the growing pattern.

We used the table as a strategic tool. It is easy to notice regularity in repeated reasoning when we see student thinking in addition to the figure number and the number of rubber duckies.

And, in the last few minutes, we extended this thinking to geometric subitizing and then the sum of the measures the interior angles of polygons.

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Teachers are learners too…

After teaching synchronous sessions, planning and recording asynchronous lessons, offering feedback to students on submitted work, and meeting with their team to forecast plans for next week, this group of teachers found joy in gathering to learn together.

#CountItAllJoy

#ThankYouTeachers

Day 22 (Day 2 Week 5) Learning from home: Time, work, encouragement, and extra care

From NPR last week:

Right now students are out of school in 185 countries. According to UNESCO, that’s roughly 9 out of 10 school children worldwide.

The world has never seen a school shutdown on this scale.

Let’s be clear. While the building is closed, Trinity School is open, caring for and teaching students. The school is not shut down. The building is closed; the school is open, and we are learning.

In this unprecedented time in our learning, schooling, and teaching history, we thoughtfully consider and ask:

How do we act and react when our learners take a stumble in their learning?  How are we teaching persistence? How do we help learners learn to stay the course? How do we teach pressing on in spite of difficulty or a stumble?

From 2012, my first year at Trinity:

“I stumbled.  I was out on a run early one Sunday morning.  I have been practicing and “doing my homework.”  Theoretically, I am training for a 10K.  Realistically, I’m just working on endurance and overcoming “I can’t” thinking.  At approximately 3 miles out, I stumbled.  In the slow motion moment, I thought “Oh, good; I’m gonna catch myself.” In actual time, wham! Here’s a quick peek at the results of my stumble.”

“OUCH! But, I was very lucky.  I did not break my nose, teeth, wrists, or anything else.  I did skin and bruise my nose, the left side of my face, my right palm, and my left knee.  I did have to call for help to get home. Three weeks later, there is only a little road-rash under my left eye.  The cleanup and healing took time, work, encouragement, and extra care.

“I took action to care for my injuries in the form of lots of salve and ibuprofen. Others took action in many ways to help.

I’ve got a warm washcloth, Bandaids, and Neosporin.  How can I help you?

It really doesn’t look that bad. You hardly notice it.

<teasing> Maybe you should consider different shoes. You know, flat shoes rather than the ridiculous ones that you usually wear.

Just give it time; be patient.  I had a similar incident, and with time and care, you will be fine – back to normal. It will get better.  I suggest vitamin E so that you won’t scar.

<again, teasing> Well, that’s what you get for running.

“Notice that no one said ‘well, you just weren’t prepared.’ No one said ‘maybe you should try harder next time.’ No one said ‘you just weren’t ready'” No one said ‘it’s okay, this is not in your strength or skill set.’

“When a learner fails to meet their own expectations – when they stumble – consider actions and reactions. They speak louder than words.

With time, action, and care, we can fix this.

What can I do to help you?

It is really not that bad. There are bright spots in your work and learning. Let’s work together to brighten the areas of concern.

In Mindset, Dr. Carol Dweck writes

“When people believe their basic qualities can be developed, failures may still hurt, but failures don’t define them.   And if abilities can be expanded – if change and growth are possible – then there are still many paths to success.” (p. 39)

“My path – on the way to a 10K – took a detour. I had to backtrack a little to reach the result I want.

In this unprecedented time, we wonder what salve and ibuprofen to offer. We know you feel bruised and banged up, and we ask: How might we care and comfort one another while expanding abilities and putting learners on some of the many paths to success? We know the current change of venue is expanding our skillsets. It feels tender, raw, and uncomfortable, yet, we are learning about our students’ learning in new and different ways. Remember, school is not closed, the building is.

School is open and learning is happening.

We are in it for the long haul, ready and able to clean up, heal, take time, work together, spread encouragement, and extend extra care.

#ThankYouTeachers

_________________________________

Dweck, Carol S. Mindset: the New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House, 2006. 39. Print.