Tag Archives: @joboaler

Summer PD: Day 2 Mathematical Flexibility

Summer Literacy and Mathematics Professional Learning
June 5-9, 2017
Day 2 – Mathematical Flexibility
Jill Gough and Becky Holden

Today’s focus and essential learning:

I can demonstrate mathematical flexibility to show what I know in more than one way.

(but , what if I can’t?)

Learning target and pathway:

Mathematics is a subject that allows for precise thinking, but when that precise thinking is combined with creativity, flexibility, and multiplicity of ideas, the mathematics comes alive for people (Boaler, 58 pag.)

…we know that what separates high achievers from low achievers is not that high achievers know more math, it is that they interact with numbers flexibly and low achievers don’t.  (Boaler, n. pag.)

UED: 8:45 – 11:15  / EED: 1:15 – 2:45

 Slide deck

Resources:

Time, accuracy, speed, & precision (TBT Remix)

It is critical that we take a moment to review the emerging evidence on the impact of timed testing and the ways in which it transforms children’s brains, leading to an inevitable path of math anxiety and low math achievement. (Boaler, Jo)

Her name was Mrs. Hughes.  I can still hear her:

F … F … J … J … F … F … J … J.

Time, accuracy, speed, and precision were ultimately important in the typing class I took my sophomore year of high school.  I am glad that I touch-type.  At typingtest.com, you can assess your typing speed and accuracy.  Here are my latest results:

Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 11.31.17 AM

And, later in the day…

Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 6.02.14 PM

There are plenty of people that do not touch type, some hunt-and-peck.  Is their work some how diminished because they may need more time than a touch typist?  If not witnessing the time and effort, would the reader of the product even know whether the author was speedy or not?

Are accuracy and precision when typing more important than speed and time?  Wouldn’t it be better to take more time and have an accurate product than to be quick with errors?

This has me thinking about assessment, testing, and time.  In a perfect world, we want both speed and accuracy.  What if we can’t have both?  What if a learner needs more time to demonstrate what they know?  Do we really expect all children to perform and produce at the same speed?  Are we sacrificing accuracy and precision for the sake of time?  Should it be the other way around? Are we assessing what our learners know and can show or how fast they can think and work?

How important is it to complete an assessment
within a fixed, pre-determined period of time?

How might we offer learners more time to demonstrate what they know and have learned?

Time is the variable; learning is the constant.


Time, accuracy, speed, & precision was first posted on April 30, 2012

Boaler, Jo. “Timed Tests and the Development of Math Anxiety.” Web log post. Jo Boaler. N.p., 06 July 2012. Web. 09 Nov. 2014.

 

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 05: Listening

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was on memory boosters.  Lesson 05 is on listening.

Project:  Listen to a couple of TED talks of your choice.
(suggestions below).

1st TED Talk:

  1. Practice the technique of visually thinking about what you are hearing.
  2. Listen to the video twice.
    1. During the first time, stop the video when needed to pause to sketch.
    2. On the second time through, do not stop the video. Work your way through and see how much you can sketch note.
2nd TED Talk:
  1. Be brave.  Practice what we’ve learned in Lesson 4: Memory Booster.
  2. Sketch-note the chosen TED talk without stopping the video.  It is ok to miss some things.
  3. Share your doodle using the hastags #ShowYourWork and YourSchoolsHashtag #TrinityLearns or #WALearns, etc.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)


Doodling the C’s – Lesson 04: Memory Boosters

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was on faces and figures.  Lesson 04 is on memory boosters.

Complete the five Memory Boosters Lessons:

Project (pick one):

  • Create a 7.5 x 10 poster of Lessons Learned from the Building Blocks, Lettering, Faces & Figures lessons using these building block.
  • Create a 7.5 x 10 poster for an upcoming class or lesson.
    • Mind map of connected ideas
    • Important message
    • Pathway of success for an essential learning.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 03: Faces and Figures

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was on lettering.  Lesson 03 is on faces and figures.

Complete the four Faces & Figures Lessons:

  1. Stick Peeps
  2. Faces
  3. Emotions
  4. Sketch-note Example

Want more practice?  Experiment with these ideas.

Project (pick one):

  • Create a 7.5 x 10 poster of Lessons Learned from the Building Blocks and Lettering lessons using the building block.  (I like Jo Boaler’s stem:  I wish everyone my age knew…)
  • Create a 7.5 x 10 poster to describe
    • an important person or event
    • an important idea(s) from our current Read Aloud
 Remember… It takes practice.
  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 02: Lettering

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was on building blocks.  Lesson 02 is on lettering.

Complete the four lessons on Lettering:

Project (pick 1):
  • Refine your poster from 01: Building Blocks to include lettering and depth.
  • Create a 7.5 x 10 poster for one of the following:
    • Main character from a favorite book.
    • Upcoming essential learning and its progression
    • New or upcoming vocabulary word, process, skill
    • …or something of your choosing
Remember… It takes practice.
  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 01: Building Blocks

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

For Lesson 01: Building Blocks guided instruction, complete the four Building Blocks lessons from  Brain Doodles by Thomas Michaud (@mybraindoodles):

Project (pick one):

  • Create a 7.5 x 10 poster of Lessons Learned from the Building Blocks lessons using the building block.  (I like Jo Boaler‘s stem:  I wish everyone my age knew…)
  • Create a 7.5 x 10 poster for an upcoming class or lesson.
Remember… It takes practice.
  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)