Tag Archives: sketchnoting

#MVIFI Collider session Sketchnoting: Show what you know more than one way

At the February 16th MVIFI Collider event for professional learning, I facilitated the following 50-minute session on sketch noting twice.

Sketchnoting:
Show what you know more than one way

Up your note taking skills by being visual. Learn this invaluable method for recording, showcasing understanding, and deepening comprehension.

We will meet and greet, norm, touch on research, play with words and word art, discuss tools, practice, participate in a feedback look, and close by setting a micro-goal.

Here’s my sketch note of the plan:

We watched Simon Sinek’s TED talk to practice live sketch noting.

Here are artifacts of learning from Twitter:

Reflection required: Learning over time #MyLearning

I am not defined by my performance today. I can grow and learn more with continued goal setting, practice, and feedback.

Yesterday I posted Patience required: Learning over time (#MyLearning) (#ShowYourWork). I ended the post wondering my learning is evident to the viewer of these artifacts.

“We do not learn from experience… we learn from reflecting on experience.” ― John Dewey

When serving as Trinity’s Personalized Learning Specialist, our Early Elementary Division Head of School, Rhonda Mitchell (@rgmteach), developed and refined a protocol for reflection.

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We want learners to collect, select, and reflect.

My COLLECTion is archived on my MyLearning Journey for #ShowYourWork Doodles and Sketch Notes Pinterest board.

I SELECTed these two from the collection:

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And, I REFLECTed on my growth and learning:

Throughout the 2014-15 school year, I doodled notes during every professional development learning session that I attended.  I remember how nervous I felt about taking notes this way during Joe’s opening faculty meeting last August.  I used an erasable pen because I was so scared of making a mistake. I remember most of his talk. The importance of our vision of pedagogy to deepen understanding, empower learners, and to cultivate community through personal experiences is clear. These tenants are reflected in our actions with learning progressions and our My Learning e-portfolios.  George’s comments in June actually connect to Joe’s comments from August.  We are in an age or era where we have connections at our fingertips.  No longer are we promoting a Jeopardy version of success.  How will we offer learners voice and choice? What if we co-create knowledge, problem-finding and problem-solving, and joyful experiences with our learners?

It is clear to me that I am more confident with the process of doodling to learn. I’m no longer using an erasable pen; in fact, I’m informed and opinionated about what works best for me. Clearly, color adds value and communicates ideas.  I see growth in my sketches of people, ideas, and connectors. I am still in awe of how much impact doodling has on my retention and recall of ideas.

I’ve learned that I listen better, think differently and more deeply, and remember more when I exercise my creativity to use visuals to represent ideas.  It is true that a picture is worth 1000s of words.  When I frantically tried to write everything down – before doodling – I could record lots of words, but did I capture any ideas? Not often.

This reminds me of timed math tests. I know! Weird connection.  It reminds me of timed math tests because of the stress and pressure of time.  I learn and remember more through doodling because I’m not frantic. I’m not afraid that I’m going to miss something.  I know that I’m visualizing big ideas and their surrounding details.

I’ve also learned that the more I practice, the more I want to learn.  I see improvement, and I see where and what I want to learn next.

I plan to continue making my thinking and learning visible using sketch noting.  I am encouraged to learn and to share.  I am not defined by my performance today. I can grow and learn more with continued goal setting, practice, and feedback.

Again, I find value and real joy in having the collection.  My portfolio of doodles shows me several concurrent learning journeys. Reflection offers glimpses of what I’m learning and where I am now. I have choice in where I go next and in how I’m going to get there.

Worth repeating:

I’ve also learned that the more I practice, the more I want to learn.  I see improvement, and I see where and what I want to learn next.  

How might we teach, model, and facilitate experiences to collect, select, and reflect learning over time? What if we offer time, encouragement, and opportunities?

Patience required: Growth over time #MyLearning

Learning is not an insta-grow experience.

Struggle – working at the edges of ability – is critical.  Patience is required as is a growth mindset.

It might take a while to see evidence of growth. What if we practice, struggle, share, and seek feedback?

I’ve been tinkering with sketch noting, a.k.a. doodling, to make thinking visible, to listen differently, and to retain information.

I started last June, and it was awful.  You can see a body of work on my MyLearning Journey for #ShowYourWork Doodles and Sketch Notes Pinterest board.

Here is  page 2 of my notes from Joe’s opening comments for Trinity Faculty on August 4, 2014.dd23378ccd6e1a1ccb03646990fe5bcd

Is my thinking visible?

Here is page 2 of my notes while learning with George Couros during his Martin Institute keynote on June 9, 2015, just a quick ten months later.
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Can you see my growth? I wonder if my learning is evident to the viewer of these artifacts.

I find value and real joy in having the collection.  My portfolio of doodles shows several concurrent journeys.

How might we teach, model, and facilitate experiences to collect, select, and reflect learning over time?

Growth over time…patience required.

I can… digital visual note taking

Since August, I’ve been dabbling with visual note taking.  You can see my progress at MyLearning Journey for #ShowYourWork doodles and sketch notes.  I’ve also started doodling to illustrate the #LL2LU SMP progressions.

I’ve been using great pens and a journal.  For months, I’ve been telling myself that I want to take notes on my iPad, but I keep doubting that I can. (Great growth mindset thinking, huh?)

I can draw on my iPad, but I wonder if, perhaps, I might need to practice to get more comfortable and gain confidence.  Isn’t this what we want from all learners in our care?  I know I can, but I am not where I want to be…yet. I can and will improve with practice and effort.

Here’s on of my first attempts using Paper by 53.  I decided to practice in my comfort zone. I chose a doodle for I can make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. persevere doodle Doodling on the iPad is different.  I can experiment, undo and redo.  While I’m not yet brave enough to use it to take note in real-time, I think it’s fun, and it offers different opportunities for self-assessment and 2nd chances.

How might we experiment with different representations, media, and strategies to enhance learning and fun?

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 08: Explaining

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was about observing.  Lesson 08 is about explaining.

Project:  What if we doodle to convey additional meaning for a learning progression?
  1. Select or write a new learning progression to highlight a pathway to success for a skill, topic, or process.
  2. Doodle to add additional information and/or meaning.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #LL2LU#ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

 

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 07: Observing

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was about reading and comprehension.  Lesson 07 is about observing.

Project:  Doodle as you observe.  Choose from 2 of the 3 choices listed below:
  1. Observe a colleague teach a lesson.  Doodle what you learn and notice.
  2. Sketch-note through a faculty meeting.
  3. Doodle the big ideas and salient points from a professional development session or workshop.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

Suggestions:

  •  Observe another teacher.  Capture the teacher moves, essential learnings, student questions, and student actions.
  • Capture the big ideas from your next faculty meeting.
  • Illustrate the important points from a conference session or keynote.  Ask the speaker to sign your sketch-note.

Doodling the C’s – Lesson 06: Reading

How do we practice Information Age skills?  Which of the C’s do we actively engage with, share in the-struggle-to-learn with others, and intentionally insert into daily practice?

Creativity and innovation, Communication, Critical thinking and problem solving, Collaboration, …

Last week’s lesson was about listening.  Lesson 06 is about reading and comprehension.

Project:  Doodle as you read for comprehension.  Choose from 2 of the 3 choices listed below:

  1. Read an article, suggestions below.
  2. Reread a chapter of your summer reading selection.
  3. Step into student shoes. Be a listener during a read aloud by doodling to an audio book.

While reading:

    • Practice the technique of visually thinking about what you are reading.
    • Sketch in the margins, on Post-it Notes, or in your sketch-note notebook.
    • Be sure to document what you read to share with others.

Remember… It takes practice.

  • Share your poster with someone and ask for feedback.
  • Scan or take a photo of your work and insert it in your Doodling the C’s Google doc, on your blog, or in your My Learning portfolio.
  • Bonus: Tweet a copy of your poster using the hashtags #ShowYourWork #TrinityLearns (or your school’s hashtag)

Suggestions (articles):

Suggestions (reread chapter from your summer reading selection)

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Suggestions (doodle to a chapter of an audio book)

Not sure about audio books? The above are free with a 30-day trial of Audible)